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ANichol

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 1002

ANichol says:

(Beginning of) The end of an era

A plea to anyone working in the IT industry.

 

Soon, I am no longer to be a moaning teacher. I'm going part-time next year on a 1 year contract to finish teaching the politics A-level to my sixth form students. After that, the department shuts and I leave the teaching profession. It's a weird mix of "about time too" and "what a shame".

 

Anyhoo...I'm now onto the question of what next?

I am going to get a lot more childcare time for my son next year, but he does start school on half-days and I'll get some support from the in-laws too so I should have a few half-days available in any week which I can use to retrain.

 

I'm looking at heading into the ICT world. This is something of the family trade, but not one that I have any real formal qualifications or experiences in. I have an old RSA/CLAIT qualification and have even taught ICT at secondary school; and as a kid I was quite IT savvy - but this was when DOS 6.2 was new and Windows (3.1) took up all the hard disk space and took 20 diskettes to load. I could write basic bat files and boot disks, etc, but am guessing such skills could use, err, modernising.

 

I am looking more for a role in network engineering (progressing to management) or systems admin type stuff as I think these are the best fit to the rest of my employment history.

 

My plea is for anything anyone knows about gaining recognised qualifications or experience for such roles as an adult. Most advice online seems to float around Certificates or Diplomas in Professional competence, but these are all 2 year full time courses aimed at 16yr olds. I don't mind mixing with the teenies (been teaching them for 10 years now) but I don't have the time (or survival funds) to study 2 years full time. I can also see if the local PC help shops would let me volunteer for a couple of hours per week to learn some stuff. But elsewise, the first rung of the ladder still seems quite out of reach at the moment.

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  • Posted 116 days ago (01 July 2014 13:33)

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Darkrapture

Joined:

Nov 09

Posts: 210

Darkrapture says:

Good Luck

I think you will find even poorly paid entry level jobs in these fields will require some sort of experience rather than industry recognised qualifications.


I've been working in or around the industry for 10 years and can't think of a single interview where my academic background was even mentioned. This includes network support and sysadmin roles.

Is there any way you could use some of your teaching contacts and do some kind of desktop/user support in a school or college to get you started?

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Beelady

Joined:

Jan 10

Posts: 3511

Beelady says:

Big changes, for you.

Best of luck, whatever you decide to do next.

If you can figure out Windows 8.1 you could pop round here and teach me. I'd happily pay to find out how to make the sodding thing work :huh:

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Beelady

Joined:

Jan 10

Posts: 3511

Beelady says:

Big changes, for you.

Best of luck, whatever you decide to do next.

If you can figure out Windows 8.1 you could pop round here and teach me. I'd happily pay to find out how to make the sodding thing work :huh:

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spondonste

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 2755

spondonste says:

Good luck but.......

Good luck but I think you might struggle a bit. Realistically you'll be up against graduates who have done computing degrees or those who have been working in the IT industry for quite some time.


The courses that you mention suggest you have the ability to use standard Microsoft office type programs but not loads else. The IT industry nowadays is often about coding for which you'll need to understand languages such as C++, HTML, JavaScript, SQL, Linux etc as well as being fluent with networking, macro's etc.

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00000

Joined:

Jun 14

Posts: 43

00000 says:

fack me dude

ya need a good dose of reality slap

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ANichol

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 1002

ANichol says:

Thanks for the replies

The ever-present catch-22 of experience. Can't get a job because I don't already have one.

Most advice seems to say I should so CCNA and a couple of MTA courses to get started; but job experience is going to be paramount.

CompTIA seems popular, but not that well respected.

Guess I'd better get looking at OU if I wanna get this done quickly.

Oh, and 00000 - my "reality slap" will be this time next year when I'm completely unemployed and out of options.

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Darkrapture

Joined:

Nov 09

Posts: 210

Darkrapture says:

CCNA

The CCNA is a good qualification if you want to go down the networking route, it's not a beginners course however and you will find people who have been doing the job for years can mess it up and have to resit several times before passing. It also expires as Cisco have a tendency to change things around to keep the revenue stream going.


I think your biggest challenge will be getting a foot in the door. Providing you can interview well your background could potentially be a big selling point. Techs like talking about old obscure shit just don't mention VAX or COBOL.

Always remember most employers will expect a certain amount of settling in time and on the job training, willing and aptitude go a long way to making up for perceived holes in your CV.

If you just want to go straight into management you might get lucky going into managing a team in an office, there's plenty of management that don't have the skills of the teams they lead, the IT Crowd is right on the money with that one! Your teaching background will help no end there.

The self study route will also look good, just make sure you don't leave it too long before you start sending out applications.

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1066tours

Joined:

Jun 14

Posts: 45

1066tours says:

good luck

And if anyone can make that bloody windows 8 work they are clearly a genius of the first water :shock:

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ANichol

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 1002

ANichol says:

Thanks Darkrapture

Been looking at CCNA and CCNP. There are loads of google ads for "do CCNA in 4 days", yet the OU offer it over 9 months part time. More inclined to trust the OU route as the "guarenteed pass" of the other is actually a "do it again for free until you pass (subject to space)".

Didn't know whehter to do CompTIA to get a quick overview course.

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Darkrapture

Joined:

Nov 09

Posts: 210

Darkrapture says:

CompTIA

From what I've seen they hold a bit more weight in the states but they are recognisable here too. I did the A+ in about 2001 as part of an interview but I don't know how it's changed since then.


The Security+ is new to me, maybe do that and the Network+ if you can do them without spending too much. 

The A+ I remember was very basic, if you've built a desktop PC and configured a BIOS you could answer the paper without any preparation. No idea how that's changed in 10 years plus.

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