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getmewingman

Joined:

Jul 14

Posts: 6

getmewingman says:

Hello, needing lots of advice!

Hello! New to the forums,


I was hoping to ask you guys for some help. I'm looking to start riding within the year, I've already saved up some money to pay for tests, licences etc. I've however hit the dilemma of where to keep my future bike. 

I've just finished my first year of uni, thus I've moved to a new flat with bicycle storage. The road I am on itself, I do not trust (Just off Gloucester Road for those of you who know Bristol). There is a residential area nearby I can rent a driveway, but is way out of my student budget (around £90 a month). Although we have a bike room downstairs, it's nothing more than a spare back room, and would firstly be a huge(ish) faff moving the bike in and out on a daily basis. The door being well, a standard door, nothing fancy, just a regular door you'd find in any building.

The trouble is, the door to this room is held by a single lock, and I'm not sure if this is trust worthy enough to hold my to be beloved bike. The shed is also used by flat mates etc for their own push bikes. Will investing in a heavy duty chain and potentially alarm do the trick? Or will it be to risky either way?

Thanks,

Wingman

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  • Posted 57 days ago (25 July 2014 21:00)

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philehidiot

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 4758

philehidiot says:

If it's a 125

then you only really need worry about casual thieves like kids and an alarm will usually scare them off.


A heavy duty chain needs to be secured to something.

If they want your bike, they'll have it. It's as simple as that.

For getting in and out of a small door you'll have to do a wiggle and a sports bike is often a little narrower.

As for insurance - if someone has left the door open, it may not cover you - you'd have to explain it's a communal area.

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getmewingman

Joined:

Jul 14

Posts: 6

getmewingman says:

Yep yep

Yep, I was planning on investing in at least an alarmed lock and disc lock to immobilise the bike.


It'll be a 125, Yamaha YBR to be exact. Would you say it might be more advisable to leave the bike outside, secured (as much as possible) and covered than leaving inside or leaving it inside with the immobilising locks?

One last q (for now) might you be able to push me in the direction of affordable but at the same time, good bike chain and or lock?

Ta!

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philehidiot

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 4758

philehidiot says:

Ideally

you want something that's not croppable by hand. If you can get the bike inside then do, ideally with a ground anchor and some kind of alarm. Be that on the garage door, a disc lock alarm or a trip wire rigged up to a shotgun blank. The first two will wake you up, the latter will get the neighbours to call the police for you. Just ensure the blank is placed where it won't cause powder burns to anyone, including you if you get it off accidentally.


19mm links and a Squire lock with a price tag of around £200 is generally a good sign for a quality chain. I think the Almax series IV is one of these and you need power tools to get through it. Do not buy cheap as you will end up losing your bike to some kids with dirt cheap croppers. There are some Youtube vids testing various chains.

An alarmed disc lock is good but they can be a pain and you get what you pay for. An alarmed one is also useful as if it has a tilt sensor it'll warn you it's on before you try and ride off - you end up on the floor and very embarrassed. You'll find people are actually quite nice when this happens. The reason a disc lock is good is that to just wheel the bike away means practically destroying the front disc and that makes a lot of noise so it needs carrying (or placing on a skateboard) which raises suspicion. An alarmed one is better for obvious reasons. I had a £30 (or maybe £40) Xena one which went off with a sparrow farting and now have an Abus Granit Detecto 8077 (£142) which is excellent - perfect sensitivity and looks / feels very secure and well made. If you're visually serious about your security then a criminal is likely to wonder what other measures you may have in place (tracker, alarm, etc) and so may well pass and move on to another bike. They usually want the easiest steal (which means it comes with the lowest risk) for the highest gain. Kids just want a bike to dick about on so out of sight is out of mind and decent chains will go a long way. Additionally, if you have decent security, don't put the steering lock on. It takes one solid kick to break it, bugger the steering and you have to not only pay for the repairs but for it to be picked up in a van by the garage.

If you get a top box, beware of the weight limit and the weight of the chain you're planning on carrying - often a top box has a limit of 3-5kg and I know mine is way heavier than this. I use a tailpack on the pillion seat for my chain when I have to carry it. If you do this, ensure it's secure as you don't want it mobile and trying to lean you over further in a corner.

Last thing - try insurance quotes with and without security. It may be a similar price without it depending on how much risk you are personally. This means if you forget to secure the bike properly or forget to put the alarm on then you're not going to end up with the insurance company not paying out. I do think that if you say you use a disc lock for example, they expect you to use it every time you leave the bike. So if you stop to get some milk and don't put it on and someone nicks it in the minute you're gone, they could refuse to pay out because you didn't secure it - lying to them and saying you did is all well and good unless there's CCTV, a witness or they recover the bike with the disc lock still in the top box. Plus if you lie to the insurance company then you have to lie to the cops as well and there you can really run into trouble.

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getmewingman

Joined:

Jul 14

Posts: 6

getmewingman says:

Saw the Almax IV

One hell of a price tag! But like you said, get what you pay for!


I'd love to rig up a shotgun blank like the pyro & explosives maniac that I am, but it being a communal area I guess it's not the best idea (or is it? :P)

I'll probably fork out on one of the Almax chains, and save up for a decent disc lock. I also saw what looked like a super heavy pad lock, bigger than a clenched fist fitted around the spokes of the wheel.Might this also be a good idea, r would it just be the same safety and convenience wise as a disk lock?

I'll have a look into insurance quotes also, and maybe even some tracking or one of those serial numbers the police put in to help with identification.

Thanks again for all the great advice, I guess there is a ton more things to think about with securing a bike than I could've imagined! 

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getmewingman

Joined:

Jul 14

Posts: 6

getmewingman says:

Saw the Almax IV

One hell of a price tag! But like you said, get what you pay for!


I'd love to rig up a shotgun blank like the pyro & explosives maniac that I am, but it being a communal area I guess it's not the best idea (or is it? :P)

I'll probably fork out on one of the Almax chains, and save up for a decent disc lock. I also saw what looked like a super heavy pad lock, bigger than a clenched fist fitted around the spokes of the wheel.Might this also be a good idea, r would it just be the same safety and convenience wise as a disk lock?

I'll have a look into insurance quotes also, and maybe even some tracking or one of those serial numbers the police put in to help with identification.

Thanks again for all the great advice, I guess there is a ton more things to think about with securing a bike than I could've imagined! 

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philehidiot

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 4758

philehidiot says:

Just

be sure to maintain the lock properly and you'll get years of service from it. You don't want to wait until it seizes up before lubing it as that means corrosion has already set in. Also means it'll make you late for whatever you're doing as you spend ages trying to get your lock to release your bike.



EDIT and a padlock would be okay as long as it definitely stops the bike dead when the wheel is turned. You'd probably fit it to the front disc.

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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mirloXXbob

Joined:

Mar 14

Posts: 168

mirloXXbob says:

Bike Security

The only thing I would add is if you're going to spend a lot on a lock, chain, etc. make sure it's something you'll be able to use on a larger bike when you move up (you will). Most locks and chains are going to be suitable for a wide variety of bikes but there may be some exceptions.

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getmewingman

Joined:

Jul 14

Posts: 6

getmewingman says:

Will do

I've settled on investing in an Almax chain with lock, followed by a decent disc lock (probably Oxford OMEGA), will do my best to keep it indoors (as mentioned above) and when the time comes, will probably have some sort of alarmed device to hand!! I have a main road nearby, with (cycle) bike lock frames nearby and the area is well lit. This might seem a stupid question, but would it be worth considering keeping a motor bike there, with all the above security? Or is keeping a bike in wide public view (locked up or not) a plain no no?? Or would it serve a good alternative, as I have no guaranteed solid ground anchor by my flat,


Thanks!

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philehidiot

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 4758

philehidiot says:

It should

be okay as a 125 is generally only attractive to kids rather than proper criminals who have the tools to get through that kind if chain. Alarms are also good if left outside - a disc lock alarm would be my choice as it won't impact on the bike's battery.

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getmewingman

Joined:

Jul 14

Posts: 6

getmewingman says:

Good to hear

I've looked up insurance quotes, and it's around the same price (Fully comp) to keep the bike inside or outside, about a fiver between the two annually.


With a small 125, is the worth getting FC? I seem to be getting mixed opinions generally, by going on TP F+T it would cost me around £300-400 and FC around £600-700. I've read that the YBR is a pretty stubborn bike to break so it's not worth FC. 

Insurance is far too confusing for me!!

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