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DUCATI HYPERSTRADA 821 (2013-on) Review

Published: 02 January 2014

Touring version of Ducati's revamped 2013-model Hypermotard gives all the thrills of a supermoto with real-world touring capability

DUCATI HYPERSTRADA 821  (2013-on)

Touring version of Ducati's revamped 2013-model Hypermotard gives all the thrills of a supermoto with real-world touring capability

Overall Rating 4 out of 5

This is the touring version of Ducati’s revamped 2013-model Hypermotard. It gives you all the thrills of a supermoto with real-world touring capability – much like KTM’s successful 990 SMT. The Hyperstrada will happily cope with trackday action (as long as the circuit isn’t too big), cross-continental riding holidays, B-road scratching, skids and wheelies. There’s plenty of power from its 110bhp,  821cc liquid-cooled engine for most occasions, but it’s a little breathless on fast A-roads. It’s roomy, comfortable, practical and has decent wind protection, but riding two-up is a squeeze.

Ride Quality & Brakes 4 out of 5

On standard suspension settings you can easily tie the Hyperstrada up in knots in the corners and run out of ground clearance surprisingly quickly. But wind on more rear preload and rebound damping (forks are non-adjustable) and the Ducati is transformed - the steering is crisp and there’s enough poise and ground clearance for trackdays. New Brembo monobloc cast aluminium front calipers are strong and there’s the added security of ABS, which can be switched-off, if you want to play.

The Hyperstrada offers lots of legroom, a comfy seat and a natural reach to the bars. A tall screen shields you from the elements, but there’s no enough wind-protection for your knees – at high speed they get splayed apart. It’s physically small, so the Ducati will only suit smaller riders and taking a pillion is a squeeze.

Engine 4 out of 5

The 821cc, 8v, liquid-cooled engine (a ‘stroked’ 796 unit) is the same as you’ll find in the 2013 Hypermotard, with the same claimed 110bhp. It’s smooth, powerful, grunty and comes with a slipper clutch as standard. You also get a choice of three riding modes: Urban, Touring and Sport. Each mode gives you differing levels of power, throttle response, traction control and ABS. Throttle response is flawless in the two lower modes, but is very direct in Sport mode.

Valve-clearance service intervals are 18,000-miles. The new motor is sips fuel and you can easily get 120-miles from the 16-litre fuel tank before the reserve light comes on.

Build Quality & Reliability 5 out of 5

Build-quality and attention to detail is superb. MCN ran a Hyperstrada long term test bike over the summer of 2013, racking up over 11,000-miles - touring, trackdays and commuting - and it never missed a beat.

Insurance, running costs & value 4 out of 5

Here’s a machine that can handle everything from touring, to commuting, Sunday blasts and trackdays. It’s a great all-rounder and excellent value, but it doesn’t quite have the power to give you the thrills of a sportsbike or super naked and it’s too small for larger riders and pillions. Yes, there are much more practical touring bikes out there, but the Hyperstrada offers something totally unique for not a great deal of money on the used market.

Insurance group: 14 of 17 – compare motorcycle insurance quotes now.

Equipment 4 out of 5

Traction control, ABS and variable riding modes all come as standard. You also get a comfy touring seat, which is 20mm lower than the Hypermotord’s, two 12v power sockets and panniers. There’s a host of Ducati official accessories available, including heated grips, a top box and a sat nav.

Facts & Figures

Model info
Year introduced 2013
Year discontinued -
New price £10,795
Used price £5,800 to £7,200
Warranty term Two year unlimited mileage
Running costs
Insurance group 14 of 17
Annual road tax £88
Annual service cost £280
Performance
Max power 110 bhp
Max torque 89.2 ft-lb
Top speed 125 mph
1/4-mile acceleration -
Average fuel consumption 48 mpg
Tank range 170 miles
Specification
Engine size 821cc
Engine type 8v, V-twin
Frame type Tubular steel trellis and cast ali single-sided swingarm
Fuel capacity 16 litres
Seat height 830mm
Bike weight 204kg
Front suspension Non-adjustable 43mm Sachs forks
Rear suspension Preload/rebound adjustable single rear Sachs shock
Front brake 2 x 320mm discs with four-piston Brembo monobloc radial calipers. ABS
Rear brake 245mm single disc with single-piston Brembo caliper. ABS
Front tyre size 120/70 x 17
Rear tyre size 180/55 x 17

History & Versions

Model history

2007 – Hyperstrada launched.

Other versions

None

Owners' Reviews

3 owners have reviewed their DUCATI HYPERSTRADA 821 (2013-on) and rated it in a number of areas. Read what they have to say and what they like and dislike about the bike below.

Review your DUCATI HYPERSTRADA 821 (2013-on)
Summary of Owners' Reviews
Overall Rating 4.3 out of 5
Ride Quality & Brakes 4 out of 5
Engine 4.3 out of 5
Build Quality & Reliability 4 out of 5
Value & Running Costs 3.7 out of 5
Equipment 4.3 out of 5
5 out of 5

A really good machine

01 February 2019 by Pedro5000

Five stars doesn't mean it's perfect but I've had this machine for four years and after every long ride I can only look at it with admiration and affection, pondering how this small machine took me and my gear through whatever came up, with a hard edged verve. All weather, all roads, it's been a champ.

Ride Quality & Brakes
4 out of 5
The bike likes to go fast - the suspension smooths out and it all comes together. Slow city streets can be jarring and some deft clutch work helps keep things smooth. My riding is usually 3 - 5 day camping trips through the Northeast US mountains. The bike is an animal, quick with lots in reserve and unfazed by weather, frost heaves, dirt roads - it just goes. Need to pass that logging truck - twist and rip. It's agile, fast or slow, but not twitchy. Highways aren't its strongest point, but they're not mine either - it'll do the miles just fine, but in big winds you can take a beating. The brakes are good - at least the fronts. The tank is good for about 120 - 150 miles and I can do that in one go if the road is interesting. Boring road, and the seat starts to hurt a bit.
Engine
5 out of 5
It's just great. The midrange is a monster. Lots of engine braking though so precise inputs are good. Keep the chain adjusted, use good gas, keep the revs up, and the engine/drivetrain is sweet - locomotive sweet. It's a big-ish twin - keep it above 3k.
Build Quality & Reliability
4 out of 5
After 30,000 + miles of fully loaded touring mostly on rough mountain back roads, I've had one problem: A shift return spring broke. Apart from Ducati's leisurely part distribution, this was minor. The clutch is a little grabby, but a properly adjusted cable goes a long way. There's a kit on the market now from the OEM, so, when the plates are worn, I'll pop it in. If you're buying one, make sure all the service bulletin work was done - a dealer will have to get your VIN - the website won't give you the right info. The TCU and canbus filter are important.
Value & Running Costs
5 out of 5
I put a good few miles on it, so most of my costs are tyres, oil, chain etc.. The usual suspects. I do all but the belts and valves myself and it's pretty straightforward. I'm on the second chain, with the third set of tyres going on and change the oil every year, sometimes twice. Nothing out of the ordinary. The belts and valves need doing every 18,000 miles: $600.00 USD.
Equipment
5 out of 5
There is nothing wrong with the blend of compactness, ergonomics and power this machine has, while also being a good tourer. It's also agile enough to be fun fast or slow - not quite small bike agile but close. That's why I got it, and there still isn't anything quite like it. The Strada bags are roomy, although the shape makes packing a little fiddly; they look good though. In fact, all the Strada bits make the bike work surprisingly well as a tourer: the screen blocks wind on the body, the bags are fine, the pillion grabs make strapping on a duffle easy, electrics, hand-guards etc. It's nicely thought out and surprisingly coherent. It's got ABS and TC, all adjustable and you can turn them off. The engine modes are good. I tend to stay in sport - it seems more direct and smoother. On dirt I'll go to urban if things get rough - and also turn down the TC and ABS.
4 out of 5

22 November 2015 by peter

light weight+power= nice dont like seat

Ride Quality & Brakes
4 out of 5
-
Engine
4 out of 5
-
Build Quality & Reliability
4 out of 5
-
Value & Running Costs
3 out of 5
-
Equipment
4 out of 5
-
4 out of 5

ride it like you stole it .

25 October 2015 by steve

I would and have recommended this bike. It is great for hooning around the yorkshire dales,lots of pulling power for the short straights and you can see over the dry stone walls.The front brakes are good but the rear brake is crap but i rarely use that anyway. I always ride in sport mode which makes the throttle snatchy in town, but using this mode means the traction control does not cut in unless thing are about to go seriously wrong.

Ride Quality & Brakes
4 out of 5
i have used this bike to do 2 scotland trips at 1800 miles each, never been uncomfortable even after 350 mile +days. The panniers are easily removable and dead easy to fit . i have bought a cheap generic top box which i bolt onto the rear rack when needed. It is not great 2 up though and the front forks have no adjustment which is very poor for an £11,000 bike. I find it handles much better if you sit forward on the bike and throw it into corners than if you sit back and ride it as you would a tourer.
Engine
4 out of 5
Cracking engine . I tried the 750 aprillia dorsoduro (that weaved at speed and the engine felt really slow compared to the ducati even though there is only a few horsepower difference) I also tried the mv agusta rivale which had terrible fuelling and you felt like you were perched on top of the bike . Then i tried the ducati multistrada as it had more power, but that bike is definately more of a tourer than a fun bike due to it steering much slower. The hyperstrada is fine for use on the uk roads but i take my fire blade to the isle of man as the ducati would be left for dead by my mates over the mountain.
Build Quality & Reliability
4 out of 5
it has been great apart from a cracked rear wheel spoke ,and i have had to use a rubber mallet to knock the front wheel rim back into shape a couple of times,but then again the bike has been airborne a few times.
Value & Running Costs
3 out of 5
It does around 120 miles to the tank on the twisties around the yorkshire dales and i ride it hard. The service intervals helped me decide to buy this bike, the old hypermotards needed services and belts twice as often as the new engine, which makes me more inclined to use the bike rather than worry about how much it is costing to run. I have done 13,000 miles in two summers, i don't commute on the bike, i just use it for fun. I get about 3000 miles from a rear tyre due to the torque and maybe 5000 from a front but that is because i wear the edges off the front tyre rather than the centre tread. The low 3 out of 5 rating is for the original r.r.p of the bike only.
Equipment
4 out of 5
I only use the pannier bags when i go touring they are very easy to fit and remove and i also remove the bracket that they mount onto as it is only a 2 minute job and it tidies the back end up.
Buying experience

I road tested one from a dealer and thought it was a great bike, but not worth the £11000 original price, i asked the dealer to give me a shout when they were about £8000 . I waited for a second hand one to come in, mine turned up with 1000 miles on it and it was only 6 months old.

Photo Gallery

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  • DUCATI HYPERSTRADA 821  (2013-on)
  • DUCATI HYPERSTRADA 821  (2013-on)
  • DUCATI HYPERSTRADA 821  (2013-on)
  • DUCATI HYPERSTRADA 821  (2013-on)
  • DUCATI HYPERSTRADA 821  (2013-on)
  • DUCATI HYPERSTRADA 821  (2013-on)
  • DUCATI HYPERSTRADA 821  (2013-on)
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