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MCN's 65 Greatest Biking Moments

Published: 29 April 2020

Updated: 29 April 2020

MCN 65 Moments

It’s a phenomenal 65 years since MCN first hit the UK’s newsstands, and to celebrate we’ve pulled together 65 of the defining biking moments throughout our history – and now we need you to vote for your favourite!

One man’s greatest moment is another lady’s most disappointing. Apparently. But whichever one of the 65 great moments in our list most strikes a chord with you, it could win you a rather pleasing prize to keep you informed, entertained and persistently tickled with temptation.

Lodge your vote now and you’ll be entered into a prize draw to win a full year’s subscription to MCN, meaning that whatever era defining biking events happen in the next 12 months, you’ll read about them first. The prize draw closes at midnight October 1, 2020.

You can get a 32-page pull-out supplement in this week's MCN to read more about each individual moment. Get your copy here:

Subscribe to MCN here

MCN65 Greatest Moments

If you know which momentous moment you want to vote for – vote NOW. If not, here's a little reminder of all 65 voting possibilities...

1955

Geoff Duke at the Isle of Man TT, 1955

MCN launches with the front cover headline news of ‘GEOFF DUKE SUSPENDED’ from all racing for having the audacity to stand with fellow riders over the issue of start money at the Dutch TT. Duke competed in 60 Grand Prix between 1950 and 1959, winning over half of the races he contested on his way to six world titles. 

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1956

Johnny Allen takes the World Speed Record, 1956

On September 6, a 27-year-old American by the name of Johnny Allen piloted a streamliner dubbed the Texas Cee-gar down the Bonneville Salt Flats at a nerve-wrenching 214.40mph. A new world record was his for the bragging and in 1959, this association with the Salt Flats brought a new Triumph called Bonneville. A biking legend was born.

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1957

Bob McIntyre does the first 100mph TT lap

The man recognised by history as the first holder of a 100mph lap of the Mountain Course is Bob McIntyre. The Glasgow-born racer started as many did in that era, racing his daily transport – and in 1957 he rode the Gilera to a momentous win and two laps at over 100mph (101.03 and 101.12mph).

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1959

Honda's first IOM TT, 1959

Back in 1954, Soichiro Honda realised what racing success at the Isle of Man TT could do for his company. And on May 7, 1959 the Honda team arrived at the TT. They entered five riders in the Ultra-Lightweight 125cc race and on June 3, Kunimitsu Taniguchi crossed the line 7min22sec after the winning MV Agusta, taking the one world championship point.

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1959

1959 Triumph Bonneville T120

It’s now sixty-one years since the most famous British motorcycle model of all time first went on sale: Triumph’s Bonneville. Born out of the Tiger 110, it sported twin carbs and was built at the behest of the aggressive US market – and named in honour of Johnny Allen’s 1956 land speed record. It was the fastest Triumph the Meriden factory had ever built.

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1960

John Surtees – multiple world champion

Surtees signed to ride for MV in 1956 and won his first world title in the 500cc class. And when Gilera and Guzzi withdrew from GP racing after the 1957 season, he went on to dominate the 500cc and 350cc classes in 1958, ’59 and ’60, winning an astonishing 32 out of 39 races. He also became the first man to win the Senior TT for three consecutive years.

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1961

Ernst Degner defects to Suzuki

Suzuki and the other Japanese factories only built winning two-strokes after Suzuki paid star MZ rider Ernst Degner a king’s ransom to defect with Walter Kaaden’s secrets. During the summer of 1961 Degner had secret meetings with Suzuki, and a plan was hatched. Degner would help Suzuki build competitive two-strokes and then he would ride them.

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1967

1967 Norton Commando 750 'Fastback'

The Commando is widely considered one of the greatest parallel twins ever. The 750 made 58bhp and was powerful enough to propel the bike to a top speed of 117mph. Better still, Norton’s Isolastic system used rubber mounts to prevent much of the engine’s vibration being translated to the rider’s hands and feet – delivering a superbly smooth ride.

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1969

Easy Rider 1969 Film

Peter Fonda, Dennis Hopper and Jack Nicolson changed the face of biking forever in the 1969 counter-culture classic. The image of Fonda riding ‘Captain America’ (the custom chopper that was the unintentional hero of the film) is one of the most iconic in motorcycling. A tale of two drug dealers, who ride around  the American south west selling dope, lighting campfires and getting stoned.

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1969

Honda CB750

Before the CB750 the idea of a Japanese inline-four was just that: an idea. By the mid 1960s Honda were serial world champions and the most modern, advanced bike factory on Earth. Their target was the British market and in 1969 they launched the CB750 for £745 and with an initial production target of 1500 a year, which doubled. Over the next eight years they made over half a million machines.

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1972

Paul Smart at Imola '72

We might be very used to seeing Ducati at the sharp end of world-class motorcycle racing but it wasn’t always the case. If you trace their success back to the source, you need to start with a Brit called Paul Smart. He rode the innovative 90° L-twin Desmo at the 1972 Imola 200, to a victory, destroying Giacomo Agostini’s lap record along the way.

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1973

Yamaha Fizzy

For an entire generation of bikers Yamaha FS1-E (Fizzy) was the key to freedom. It was the first bike of your dreams if you were growing up in the 1970’s. The term ‘Fizzy’ has become a generic term for Yamaha’s sports moped, which was so popular with the rebellious youth of the 1970s. But to be accurate the term came from one specific model, the FS1-E, where ‘E’ meant ‘England’.

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1973

Triumph Factory Sit In

In September of 1973 Dennis Poore boss of Norton Villiers Triumph, announced a major restructure and that the Meriden works would shut. The 4500 employees weren’t keen and those who remained after the initial cull rose up to form a worker’s cooperative. And so started a two-year sit-in. By late 1973, all models except the T120 had been discontinued and debts continued to spiral.

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1973

Helmet wearing becomes law

On June 1, 1973 it became compulsory in the UK to wear a helmet if you wanted to ride, or be taken as pillion, on a motorcycle. The law had been hastily assembled and passed on February 7 of the same year, and met with significant opposition from riders, and some politicians, claiming that it was an affront to free choice and civil liberty.

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1975

Evel Knievel at Wembley

When Evel Knievel wiped out at Wembley in 1975 there was a real fear that he might well die in the stadium. The whole place held its breath. Then Knievel, braving the pain of a broken pelvis, stood up to speak to the 80,000 strong crowd and reveal he would never jump again. Of course, he did – just six months later, in fact – but no-one was to know at the time.

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1975

Agostini

Trying to pick a specific year within Ago’s career to highlight as ‘the one’ is like trying to decide which doughnut to eat first. But if we were to hang our helmet on a particular, it’s 1975. Already a multiple world champion in 1968, and with the Japanese out and MV surging to the height of powers, while Hailwood took early retirement, Ago delivered the biggest period of domination the championship has ever seen.

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1975

Sheene crash at Daytona

Barry Sheene’s Daytona crash in March, 1975 was the fastest on record – at 175mph and it was remarkable that he survived.  The tally of injuries included a broken left thigh and right arm, compression fractures to several vertebrae, broken ribs and extensive road rash on his back. He said later: “If I’d been a race-horse, I’d have been shot.”

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1978

First ever Paris-Dakar race

While technically considered as the 1979 Paris-Dakar, the race started on December 26, 1978. Two years of planning by Theirry Sabine, after he got lost in the deserts of Libya on the Abidjan-Nice rally in 1977, he decided not to turn his back on danger but ride towards it. The idea was formed and on Boxing Day, 1978, the first Paris-Dakar riders left the Place du Trocadero in Paris on a 10,000km quest to reach Dakar.

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1978

Hailwood takes the win

As comebacks go, this was one of the best of all time. Despite an absence of 11 years, Hailwood returned to the TT on a Ducati 900 supported by a Manchester bike shop and surpassed himself – stunning the crowd, and his rivals, with a race record of 108.51mph and a lap record of 110.62mph. He started 50 seconds behind favourite Phil Read and pursued him relentlessly, leading on the road at the halfway point, it was the most exciting comeback ever seen.

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1979

Honda NR500

Between 1962 and 1967, Honda racked up 15 championships. But one title, the premier 500cc class, still eluded them. At the same time, the European factories who had the ear of the rule makers weren’t happy with their sudden relegation. In came new rules, designed to save costs by massively reducing race machine complexity, overnight the exotic Japanese machines disappeared. It took till 1979 before Honda returned with the NR500 at the British Grand Prix.

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1979

Sheene and Roberts do battle

Silverstone witnessed one of the most talked about GP battles of all time in 1979 between British superstar Barry Sheene and American upstart Kenny Roberts. Sheen hadn’t finished in four of the first six races and had lost the 1978 title to Roberts. The race-long battle intensified on the penultimate lap and Sheened was determined that nothing other than a win would suffice.

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1980

Yamaha RD350LC

Arguably the most loved and inspirational Japanese bike of all, Yamaha’s RD350LC was a complete stroker of genius. In 1978 Yamaha’s RD250/400 was due for replacement and ever-tightening emissions regulations spelled the end for performance two-strokes in the USA. Yamaha decided that the successors to the air-cooled RDs would be aimed at Europe, designed with assistance from Yamaha Europe and be as sporty and innovative as possible.

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1980

BMW R80GS

Even BMW aren’t 100% certain how the G/S came about but it is generally accepted that test engineer Laszlo Peres is the father, while Hans Muth would claim the idea started with him, and the desire to build a Gentleman’s Scrambler (GS). A keen off-road rider, Peres built himself an 800cc boxer-engined bike to compete with in German enduro events as early as the 1960s, but it was in the late 1970s his baby came to fruition.

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1983

Alan Carter

At 18 years and 227 days, and in only his second 250GP, British rider Alan Carter stormed through the Le Mans field from last to stand on the top step. This feat saw ‘Mighty Mouse’ become the youngest-ever GP winner, a record that stood for 21 years until an 18 years and 202 days old Dani Pedrosa took it when he won his debut 250GP race in 2004.

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1985

Fast Freddie Spencer

Freddie Spencer’s rise to GP fame was nothing short of meteoric. In 1983 at the age of just 22 he became the youngest ever 500cc world champion, taking over the accolade from Mike Hailwood, and also winning Honda their first-ever 500cc title. But ‘Fast’ Freddie wasn’t done yet and in 1985 he achieved the incredible feat of winning both the 250 and 500cc titles in the same year – a feat that has never, and will never, be repeated.

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1985

World Motocross Championships

In 1985 you only entered the motocross world championship if you were as hard as nails – and few were harder than British HRC factory rider Dave Thorpe. Riding the evil CR500 two-stroke, Dave took the first of his three FIM World Motocross Championship titles in 1985, rewarding HRC’s faith in him and taming the CR. “The art of riding the CR was to use its torque,” Dave remembers. “If you started to go up and down the gearbox and use its power it would bite you – hard.”

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1988

First bike to have ABS

BMW took an ABS system from their car department and modified it fitted it to the K100LT, making it the first production bike to feature ABS. The system weighed 11kg and consisted of two modulators that were fitted on either side of the bike. Never the most effective system and by 1993 BMW had refined it. Their second-generation system, called ABS II, combined all the components in a single package which was located under the bike’s tank.

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1990

Triumph reborn

In 1983, industrialist John Bloor bought the rights to the Triumph name following the collapse of the British industry. Many assumed Bloor would mothball the brand, but behind the scenes something exciting was happening. In the late 1980s, Bloor assembled a small design team, who began work on a new range of modern Triumphs and by 1990 the first bikes were ready to launch.

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1992

Iconic Honda Fireblade is born

While the 1985 Suzuki GSX-R750 created the sportsbike blueprint, it was the 1992 CBR900RR-N FireBlade that heralded the modern litre sportsbike. In an era of 750s, Honda’s decision to build an 893cc (they did test a 750cc version) machine was revolutionary – as was their use of technology. Under the guidance of project leader Tadao Baba, the Blade was built using the very latest computer tech.

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1992

Steve Hislop

In what is widely regarded as the most exciting TT race of all time, 1992 saw Steve Hislop on the Norton NRS588 line up against Carl Fogarty on the Yamaha OW01 in the Senior. During a race that saw the two fiercely contesting the lead and trading fastest laps, Hislop emerged victorious by just 4.4 seconds over the six-lap 226-mile race while Foggy claimed a new outright lap record of 123.61mph, which stood unbroken for seven years.

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1994

Birth of the Ducati 916

Brainchild of legendary designer the late, great, Massimo Tamburini, the 916 is far more than just a motorcycle, it is a piece of art, a race winner, a movie star and remains to this day many riders’ fantasy machine. Built at a time when Ducati were in need of a hero model, the 916 certainly delivered.

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1994

King Carl 'Foggy' Fogarty

In 1994, Carl Fogarty and the Ducati 916 paired up to become the dominant force in World Superbikes, taking the first of their four titles. Over the next six seasons, the pair (aside from a brief affair with Honda in 1996) would take 55 race wins and 104 podiums before a career-ending injury in 2000 saw Foggy forced to retire.

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1996

Valentino Rossi's first win in 1996

Following a hectic last-lap battle with Jorge Martinez, a fresh-faced rider called Valentino Rossi took his first GP win at Brno in 1996 during his debut year on the Aprilia RS125R. Few could have predicted that 24 years later at the age of 41 the same rider would be a nine-time world champion and still battling it out at the front of MotoGP races.

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1997

Dougie Lampkin - trials god

Dougie Lampkin was always destined to be a trials star and in 1997 his total domination of the sport began when he took both the World Indoor and World Outdoor Championships. For the next five years he retained both titles and went on to win the Outdoor title for seven consecutive seasons, and you can add six Scott Trial and 12 SSDT victories, too.

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1998

Launch of the 1998 Yamaha YZF-R1

After Honda’s 1992 FireBlade caught the rest of Japan off-guard, it was Yamaha who were the first to respond and 1998 saw the launch of the YZF-R1. The new bike was quite simply a sportsbike revolution. With a 998cc engine, a claimed weight of 177kg and a class-trumping 150bhp – the R1 demolished the opposition.

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1999

1999 Suzuki Hayabusa threatens 200mph

The Suzuki GSX1300R Hayabusa arrives. What made the Busa so outstanding wasn’t the fact it made 172bhp and looked a bit odd, it was that the analogue speedo proudly displayed 220mph, hinting this was a production bike that could crack the double ton! And that is exactly what got Suzuki into hot water…

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1999

Brands Hatch WSB 1999

On a sunny weekend in 1999 the World Superbike round at Brands Hatch became the UK’s largest outdoor sporting event as a total of 89,000 fans packed themselves in to cheer on Carl Fogarty. Even more amazingly, it is estimated a total of 120,000 attended over the course of the weekend. The campsite carnage that weekend has gone down in legend…

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1999

David Jefferires aboard the V&M R1

The 1999 Isle of Man TT has gone down in history as a David versus Goliath moment as a small British team on a £25,000 YZF-R1 managed to humble the might of HRC and their £500,000 WSB-spec RC45. On the V&M R1, David Jefferies was a relative newcomer, lining up in only his fourth TT. But 1999 was to be DJ’s year.

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2000

Neil Hodgson and Chris Walker battle for the BSB title

In what was probably the most epic BSB season ever, Ducati-mounted Neil Hodgson went head-to-head with Suzuki’s Chris Walker in a grudge match that resulted in a few trips to the gravel trap for both riders. Fired up by fans who were either rooting for Neil or Chris, it was a rivalry that split families and friends – but it was Hodgson who came out on top.

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2000

Joey Dunlop wins at the 2000 TT

At the ripe old age of 48, no-one thought that Joey Dunlop could win another F1 TT – especially on the fickle Honda SP-1 against the V&M Yamaha R1s ridden by Dave Jefferies. Riding with incredible determination, Joey took the lead and eventually won by nearly a minute, reducing grown men to tears of joy. He took two more wins that week.

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2002

Colin Edwards and Troy Bayliss battle hard at Imola in 2002

The final race of the 2002 WSB season was one of the most memorable of all time and was filled with drama. Having dominated the first half of the season, Troy Bayliss on the Ducati 998 found his lead eaten into when Honda SP-2-mounted Colin Edwards received some special HRC parts following the Suzuka 8-Hour race. It was a gold-plated battle for the title.

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2003

Loris Capirossi pilots Ducati's new MotoGP V4

Having dominated the WSB championship, in 2003 Ducati switched focus to MotoGP, entering the premier class with their all-new GP3 piloted by Troy Bayliss and Loris Capirossi. Blisteringly fast from the very outset, it didn’t take long for the GP3 to get into winning ways, taking the top step at the Catalan GP after just six rounds.

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2004

Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman's Long Way Round

Filmed in 2004, the Long Way Round TV series and subsequent book went on to have a seismic effect on the motorcycling world. What was initially just meant to be the story of two mates riding around the world ended up becoming the defining moment in the birth of the adventure bike movement, inspiring countless riders to venture into the wilderness.

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2004

Valentino Rossi moves to Yamaha in 2004

In a move that had it all – including secret meetings and people hiding under tables – 2004 saw Honda’s golden boy Valentino Rossi swap sides and sign for rivals Yamaha to ride the YZR-M1. Could Rossi win on the previously under-performing Yamaha? It didn’t take long to find out… Rossi took nine race wins and the world title in his first year with Yamaha.

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2005

Nick Sanders circumnavigates the globe in 2005

When you are picking a bike to circumnavigate the world, an R1 wouldn’t be at the top of your list. But in 2005 Nick Sanders chose Yamaha’s sportsbike to attempt a new Guinness World Record. And amazingly, 19,300 miles and 19 days and four hours later, he broke the record, averaging over 1000 miles a day on the R1.

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2006

Travis Pastrana nails a double backflip

Already the first man ever to backflip a bike, he chose the 2006 X-Games in Los Angeles to attempt to be the first to land a double backflip in competition. And true to his hero Evel, he did it with a huge crowd looking on. “If I crash at the bottom of the ramp, I’m done,” he told the audience before his attempt. Travis nailed the jump, making the impossible look easy.

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2006

Ducati launch the Desmosedici D16 RR

Costing £40,000, Ducati's Desmosedici D16 RR shared its DNA with the GP6 MotoGP bike on which Loris Capirossi and Sete Gibernau competed in the final year of the 990cc beasts and had the same bore and stroke, twin-pulse firing order, desmo valve system, magnesium cases etc... The first proper MotoGP rep for the road had landed.

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2007

John McGuinness does the first 130mph TT lap

There was a buzz surrounding the 2007 TT because thanks to slight modifications to the track’s surface, it looked very likely that the man on form – King of the Mountain, John McGuinness – might be able to crack the magic 130mph barrier. And he did, in the last race of the week. “You can only get a first once and that 130mph lap will always be mine,” he said.

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2007

Casey Stoner 2007 MotoGP champion

Having made his debut in MotoGP the year before, Casey Stoner had secured one podium on a Honda before switching to Ducati to partner Loris Capirossi on the GP7. Seen by most of the paddock as the ‘second’ rider, Stoner soon displayed his prodigious talent by winning the first race of the year and going on to take the world title.

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2008

Scott Redding wins at Donington Park in 2008

When Scott Redding won the 125GP at Donington Park in 2008 at 15 years and 170 days he not only became the youngest GP winner ever, he was also the first Brit to win their home GP since Ian McConnachie in 1986. In a field that contained the likes of Marc Marquez (who was also a rookie), Andrea Iannone, Pol Espargaro, Jonas Folger and Bradley Smith.

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2010

Ian Hutchinson's amazing 5 TT winning week

The 2010 TT was all about one man – Ian Hutchinson. The quietly-spoken rider from Yorkshire achieved the unthinkable, taking five wins in a single week and writing his name in the history books for one of the greatest feats in TT history. “I said to a mate that I thought I could win any of the five,” Hutchinson remembers, “but I didn’t mean all five!”

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2013

Marc Marquez wins MotoGP title at his first attempt

Rookies don’t win the title in their first season in the premier class and even Valentino Rossi took a year to find his feet – but not Marc Marquez. Stepping up from Moto2, Marc lifted the 2013 MotoGP title, becoming the youngest MotoGP champion ever at 20 years and 266 days, almost a year younger than previous holder, Freddie Spencer.

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2015

Danny Kent wins Moto3 title

In a season that saw Danny Kent appear to do his best not to win the title and suffer a major end-of-season wobble, the 21-year-old managed to hold his nerve and in the final race of the year at Valencia became Britain’s first solo world champion in 38 years when he lifted the 2015 Moto3 title.

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2015

Honda RC213V-S arrives

In 2013 Honda announced they were going to build an RCV for the road and two years later the RC213V-S arrived. With a £137,000 price! A full on MotoGP bike with lights, the frame was built by Moriwaki, the V4 engine was based on the RC213V’s motor and the whole bike was assembled by the HRC technicians who build the firm’s MotoGP machinery. In road trim it made 159bhp, to increase that to 215bhp just add the £12,000 Sports Kit.

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2015

Rossi and Marquez Clash

Many riders attempt to play mind games to unsettle a rival. And none do it better than Valentino Rossi. A smiling assassin, Rossi rattled former challengers such as Biaggi, Stoner and Gibernau with his carefully targeted comments but in 2015 he met his match in Marc Marquez. It all boiled over in Sepang. Rossi accused Marc of assisting Lorenzo to the title in a pre-race press conference and then on track Rossi appeared to lash out at Marc, who then crashed. Penalised by Race Direction for irresponsible riding and causing contact, Rossi was forced to start the final race of the year last on the grid. He lost out on winning the world title by five points.

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2015

Robbie Maddison rides on water

A video emerged on YouTube that made everyone stop and stare in amazement – Robbie Maddison had built a motorcycle to ride on water. And not a jet ski, a motocross bike with two skis fitted to it. Developed in association with DC Shoes, preparing and testing the bike for the video ‘Pipe Dreams’ took Robbie over two years and was far from plain sailing (ahem). And that was just the start, once he had built it he then need to master riding it.

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2016

Guy Martin breaks records on the Wall of Death

You have to hand it to everyone’s favourite truck fitter/TT racer/TV personality/dare devil/tea drinker, Guy Martin doesn’t lack bravery. Yet in 2016 even he was a little nervous when faced with a 37.5-metre diameter Wall of Death. Not only would he be pulling over 5.2G he was also going it on live TV! Guy set a best of 70.33mph riding a modified Indian Scout before dragging out his own home-built BSA R3 to up the pace to 78.15mph, securing a Guinness World Record.

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2017

Sam Sunderland takes Paris Dakar win

Red Bull KTM rider Sam Sunderland became the first Brit to win the super-tough Dakar Rally. Considering the event has been running for 38 years and the likes of Colin McRae have unsuccessfully given it a shot on four-wheels, it was a massive achievement and one that came about through sheer grit and determination. Despite entering seven Dakars, Sunderland had actually only finished one – the event he won!

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2018

Hickman rides into TT history books

The 2018 TT was dominated by the emergence of a new generation of stars – led by Peter Hickman and Dean Harrison. With Hickman claiming his first TT win in the Superstock race, the Senior looked like it would be a spectacular, and very fast, battle between the dynamic duo. It didn’t disappoint. For five of the six laps it was Harrison who led the way but on the last lap Hickman recorded the fastest ever lap of the Mountain course at 135.452mph to snatch victory, making him officially the world’s fastest road racer.

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2018

Ducati Panigale V4 arrives

Ever since Fabio Taglioni designed the 750 ‘round case’ motor in 1970, Ducati’s sportsbikes have been V-twins. In 2018, it’s all change, when they launch the Panigale V4, gone was the V-twin, already pushed to its maximum limits, and now replaced by a V4. Inspired by their MotoGP bike, Ducati’s new superbike has four cylinders and the ‘Twin Pulse’ firing order its Desmosedici Stradale engine sounds and feels like a twin, and makes more power than before.

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2018

Ana Carrasco becomes first female world champion

“Women don’t just have to be grid girls – they can race too.” When 21-year-old Ana Carrasco won the World Supersport 300 series on a Kawasaki Ninja 400 in 2018 she became the first woman to win a solo motorcycle world championship and more than proved her point. Yes, she is female, but she is also an extremely fast racer!

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2019

Hickman's the fastest road racer on Earth!

Having set the fastest ever average speed for a road race lap at the 2018 TT, in 2019 Peter Hickman went one stage further at the Ulster GP. Recording an average speed of an incredible 136.415mph around the County Antrim circuit during the Superbike race, Hickman returned the title of ‘world’s fastest road race’ back to Dundrod. Although to be fair, it was him who took it off them anyway!

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2019

Rea takes title number five

At the start of the season, Alvaro Bautista on the new Panigale V4 R blew the competition away, taking elevenstraight wins in an emphatic display that saw everyone assume the title was his. Everyone except Jonathan Rea, that was. He secured second place in nearly every round, when the Spaniard’s run ended in Imola, Rea took the win. He was only 43 points behind and 496 still up for grabs. A crash proved Bautista wasn’t invincible and the tables turned, Rea took six successive wins and Bautista’s challenge fell apart

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2019

Redding takes the BSB title

Redding’s carefree attitude instantly endeared him to fans and lanky Ducati rider was seen by many as a serious title challenger on his Be Wiser Panigale V4 R. A treble at Donington saw Scott break his BSB duck and his win at Knockhill, a track he had never been to before, made everyone take notice. During the rest of the season his skill and ability to learn new tracks saw him enter the Showdown in second place. Knowledge of Assen and Donington saw him win the first four Showdown races and at Brands he emerged as BSB’s youngest champion at 26 years-old.

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2019

Harley-Davidson release the LiveWire

Harley- Davidson become the first major-brand motorcycle manufacturer to release an electric motorcycle, the LiveWire. Priced at £28,750, with a range of roughly 90 miles (Harley claim 146 miles is possible in town use), the LiveWire’s fast charging technology allows the battery to refill to 80% in just 40 minutes.

Claiming a 0-60mph time of three seconds, the combination of the H-D Revelation electric motor (Harley’s most powerful motor to date) and a chassis boasting quality components such as Brembo brakes, Showa suspension it’s sporty. It suffered a few teething issues, you have to applaud Harley or having the guts to bring such a radical project to the market. And doing it first!

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Those all-important T&Cs 

The prize draw closes at midnight October 1, 2020. This competition is open to entrants aged 16 and over. There is one prize which consists of one one-year subscription to MCN. UK mainland residents may choose from either a print or digital subscription. A winner without a UK mainland address will receive their subscription digitally. The winner will be the first name drawn at random from all valid entries after the closing date and notified by email and has 30 days to respond before an alternative winner is chosen. No purchase is necessary. 

Full terms and conditions can be found on our competitions T&C page

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