Honda RC213V-S: Have you ordered one yet?

Published: 17 July 2015

The order book is now open for Honda's MotoGP bike for the road, the RC213V-S. To purchase an RC213V-S you have to complete an order entry form on the exclusive RC213V-S website. Once submitted, a Honda dealer will contact you to make sure you're a real person (with real money), and the process of owning the most special bike of our generation will commence. You've got until midnight on September 30, 2015.

"The RC213V-S has inherited the specifications of the RC213V to thoroughly ensure mass concentration and reduced friction, as well as all key aspects in manufacturing that set the RC213V apart as a MotoGP machine from ordinary mass production models, with overwhelming differences which involve light weight and precise machining of the components, plus superior expert skills required in manufacturing," say Honda.

“In addition, the RC213V-S is equipped with control technologies used on the RC213V. The RC213V consists only of the necessary parts for winning races, based on the idea of changing specifications as necessary according to the rider and course. To achieve the specifications that make the RC213V-S eligible to run on public roads, the minimal amount of necessary changes and additions has been made compared to the RC213V."

Tech talk – RC213V-S

ENGINE: The 90-degree V4 delivers a claimed 212bhp at an rpm Honda won’t yet reveal but customers will also get an HRC exhaust and ignition ‘track only’ kit that will hike the power even higher. Crankcases are aluminium rather than the racer’s magnesium, but otherwise are MotoGP spec. Pistons are modified to increase service intervals and there are conventional valve springs, slipper clutch and gearbox.

STYLING: The overall styling of the bike is identical to that of the show ‘concept’ bike shown in Milan last year; right now to the Freddie Spencer 500GP/NS400R inspired red, white and blue paintjob. Indicators are narrower and longer than those seen on the concept bike last year.

LIGHTS: The final production bike appears to have ditched the LED lights that were patented along the way by Honda and were thought to be part of this bike’s design. Conventional halogen headlight bulbs can be made smaller, lighter and take up less space thanks to the lack of need for heat exchangers needed by LEDs.

EXHAUST: The titanium standard exhaust is as close to the look of the MotoGp as possible but still manages to be road legal for noise and emissions. The standard of the construction is sublime but most impressively it’s the way the silencers and the catalytic converter has been hidden away.

SWINGARM: The swingarm is another part that has maintained as much of the design and engineering of the MotoGP bike and is the same aluminium design. The swingarm is 55mm longer than that of a CBR1000RR Fireblade in order to stop wheelies.