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How the illegal JK100 helmet looked before it was subjected to impact tests
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Trading Standards warning over unsafe helmets

By Tony Hoare -

General news

 15 May 2014 14:37

Riders are being warned to look out for potentially unsafe motorcycle helmets after Trading Standards seized a batch of lids that were for sale online.

The Chinese-made Jiekai helmets were not approved for use on European roads and subsequent tests on behalf of Peterborough City Council Trading Standards found they performed massively below the standards required in Europe.

The Jiekai JK1000, or JK100 as it’s listed on the box, had a chin cup on the restraining strap, which is outlawed under both the British Standard and the more commonly used European ECE 22.05 standard.

When subjected to impact tests specified in the European standard, which allows a maximum transferred energy through the helmet of 275G, the Jiekai helmet recorded scores in the region of 1000-1300G.

The helmet, constructed to meet lower standards applicable in other countries, broke up after just two of the four impacts required for the European test and the test was halted.

Peter Stonely, Principal Trading Standards Officer for Peterborough City Council, said: “Although our local supplier has co-operated with us to take this product off the market, we are concerned that consumers may have bought these from other sources.”

He added: “If in doubt, do not use these helmets. They will not meet the legal standards, so you are breaking the law by wearing them and they put you at real risk of un-necessary injury in the event of an accident. All consumers who think they have bought one of these helmets should stop using them and check with their suppliers immediately.”

The helmets tested by Trading Standards were marked with a label on the back reading ‘GB811-1998’, which is not recognised in Europe. The helmets were offered for sale on an internet site for around £25 and the retailer involved is now part of a wider investigation by Trading Standards.

Jiekai helmets are made in China and offered for export through websites that help factories in the Far East sell their goods to overseas markets.

MCN found Jiekai’s listing for the JK100 helmet, which is offered for export in a minimum quantity of 500 helmets, on one such website. In the company’s description of the helmet, it boasts that the paint “can not scratch by finger nail”. It makes no claim that the JK100 model is ECE-approved, though it does offer some other helmets that it claims are approved to the ECE standard.

Peter Stonely added: “If in doubt, do not use these helmets. They will not meet the legal standards, so you are breaking the law by wearing them and they put you at real risk of un-necessary injury in the event of an accident. All consumers who think they have bought one of these helmets should stop using them and check with their suppliers immediately.”