SUZUKI GSX-R750 (2011-on) Review

Published: 11 February 2011

"Still the perfect mix of power and handling, but thanks to the lighter weight, acceleration is now more towards a superbike than a 600"

SUZUKI GSX-R750  (2011-on)

"Still the perfect mix of power and handling, but thanks to the lighter weight, acceleration is now more towards a superbike than a 600"

Overall Rating 5 out of 5

After years of gentle evolution Suzuki has gone to town on its 2011 GSX-R750. Weighing in at 190kg, fully-fuelled and ready to go, it’s a massive 8kg lighter than the old model, giving the 148bhp GSX-R750 a mouth-watering power-to-weight ratio.
The 750’s rolling chassis and bodywork is completely new, but it doesn’t get the GSX-R600’s radical engine overhaul and the resulting 1kg extra weight reduction. Aside from minor revisions to make it breath more easily, the 750’s motor is essentially the same as before, but it now promises to spin up faster and make more low and midrange power. Suzuki claims it’s 10% more fuel efficient too.
It still has the perfect mix of power and handling, but thanks to the lighter weight, acceleration is now more towards a superbike than a 600. It doesn’t have the new close-ratio gearbox fitted in the 600, so feels longer-legged in the higher gears on track, but will it will make for a less frantic machine on the road.

It’s fun, fast and handles beautifully, but crucially it’s very easy to ride fast, unlike a bigger sportsbike. Pound-for-pound we reckon it’s one of the best sportsbikes you can buy.

Ride Quality & Brakes 5 out of 5

It’s still civilised, comfy and thanks to adjustable footpegs, roomy enough for tall riders too. The suspension is plush on the move and there’s lots of adjustment for track riding too. Showa Big Piston Forks give lots of support and feel, while Brembo Monobloc calipers are a big improvement over the old model’s brakes. They still fade on track, but not as much as before. With much less weight to lug around, the GSX-R750 is a joy to ride fast. It loads you with feedback and flatters your riding. There are few bikes that can cover ground as fast and are such fun at the same time. The new chassis has a 15mm shorter wheelbase, so steering is even lighter than before. In the real world, the GSX-R750 is every bit as fast as a 1000.

Engine 5 out of 5

Unlike the 2011 GSX-R600 there are only minor changes to the 148bhp, 750cc inline-four-cylinder motor. It now has pentagonal-shaped ventilation holes in the block, instead of round, which they say reduces pumping losses inside the engine and creates more bottom end power.

The primary injector nozzles are changed from 41 to 35 degrees inside the throttle bodies. The gearbox remains the same. A revised, more efficient ECU has been moved from under the seat to the top of the airbox to save weight on the length of wiring loom.

Blip the throttle and you still get that angry, metallic GSX-R rasp from the airbox and exhaust. The revs spin up almost as quickly on the move, racing through the gears, as it does at a standstill. The GSX-R750’s performance is as much as you’ll ever need on the road or track.

Build Quality & Reliability 4 out of 5

In terms of reliability, GSX-Rs will never let you down. They’ll take any abuse you throw at them all day long – they seem to actually enjoy it. Build quality is very good, but the paint finish isn’t as deep as some machines and can stone chip easily.

Insurance, running costs & value 5 out of 5

The days of a sub-eight grand GSX-R750 are sadly gone, as prices of Japanese are climbing to levels that some say they should’ve been years ago. Paying over £10k for the 2011 GSX-R750 may seem a lot now, but for your money you’ll be getting a sportsbike you can really use and enjoy to the maximum. It’s not as buzzy as a 600, nor is it as wildly powerful, or as a tricky to ride superbike - you ride it, not the other way around. The GSX-R750 is close to perfection.

Insurance group: 16 of 17 – compare motorcycle insurance quotes now.

Equipment 4 out of 5

Compared to the latest 1000s, the GSX-R750 is sparsely-equipped, but that’s the way it’s supposed to be: it’s light, simple and fast. It does have a speed-sensitive, electronic steering damper and two power maps, which are easily switchable from the left bar. There’s a new dash, which incorporates a gear position indicator and lap timer and of course those Showa forks and Brembo brakes.

Owners' Reviews

8 owners have reviewed their SUZUKI GSX-R750 (2011-on) and rated it in a number of areas. Read what they have to say and what they like and dislike about the bike below.

Review your SUZUKI GSX-R750 (2011-on)
Summary of Owners' Reviews
Overall Rating 4.6 out of 5
Ride Quality & Brakes 4.8 out of 5
Engine 4.5 out of 5
Build Quality & Reliability 4.9 out of 5
Value & Running Costs 4.5 out of 5
Equipment 4.1 out of 5
5 out of 5

2016 GSX-R750

31 March 2016 by Boz

I feel that overall the 2016 GSX-R750 is a compact, lightweight, agile and comfortable motorcycle with a lot of usable power, making it great value for money. Read more

Ride Quality & Brakes
5 out of 5
-
Engine
5 out of 5
-
Build Quality & Reliability
5 out of 5
Have not had any issues thus far.
Value & Running Costs
5 out of 5
The above is in $AUD
Equipment
4 out of 5
Lacking some of the electronics features that come standard on European bikes, having said that this shortfall is reflected in the lower purchase price.
Buying experience

Suzuki dealership very friendly and helpful.

5 out of 5

Great Sportbike for the Average Guy.

30 March 2016 by The Dude

This is my second GSX-R750, the natural progression would be to the 1000, but I stuck with the 750 because it does everything I need and I really don't need to go any faster. I like to wind out a bike and doing this on a 1000 would be too fast, plus... Read more the insurance is 50% higher on the 1000 in my area. Another aspect of sticking with the 750 is fuel range, on some stretches on my favorite back roads it is more than 100 miles between gas stations, this actually puts a lot of bikes in a tough spot. I can easily get over 40mpg on this bike, hit it hard where it matters, and cruise the boring sections. Don't be fooled by the 'most comfortable sportbike' mantra, though, after about 4 hours you start to suffer, by the end of a 6 hour ride you are in agony. So tours to the best backroads require an overnight stay. In the end, when I review all other bikes, the GSX-R750 is just the most reliable, sensible, fun bike I can imagine for my style of riding. It sits right in the middle of the sporty riding, long day trip, reasonable cost of ownership, sportbike thrills machine (Ninja 636 also sounds good, though). Of course the new R1 beckons, but it sounds like that bike is just faster than I need and has some additional penalties (comfort, $$), the 750 is recommended for your average guy like me.

Ride Quality & Brakes
4 out of 5
Very stable and great handling, but a bit stiff and can be a bit choppy on crap roads. Brakes work well for street use, average feel, good enough power.
Engine
5 out of 5
Great fueling top to bottom, howls and growls, mostly induction noise, exhaust is very quiet. Has just enough power to entertain without need for traction control or concern with slipping the rear all the time. Front end stays down in all gears through redline (a plus for me).
Build Quality & Reliability
5 out of 5
Has never let me down, 3rd GSXR (600, 750, 750) in 4 years and 40K miles, all have been 100% reliable. Quality is basic, not a sex machine, but not a dog either.
Value & Running Costs
4 out of 5
$1200 for 6 service package (~18K miles), includes all parts and labor, plus I eat tyres (rears every 2K miles). So, yeah, if you include the bike payment, insurance, service, and tires its not a cheap hobby riding a sportbike.
Equipment
4 out of 5
Just a basic sportbike, great front headlight.
4 out of 5

A Year to remember

25 May 2014 by plcorg

Just about to part company with my 750 after buying one new in June 2013, have to say that whilst I've loved it there have been some drawbacks. Low Speed handling is hard with a lack of usable power out of the corners, unlike an R1, which with... Read more more power seems more stable but having ridden my 750 in properly, the mid range and top end is awesome and had it checked on bench to find it's producing more than the book says with no mods! The Bridgestone tyres the bike is supplied with are vveyr sticky but lose shape far to easily for my liking - if you're on too many motorways be warned the standard BT16's will have about 3-4000 useful miles in them. Changed tyres for Diablo Strada's six months in and the bike became better and better. As a major 'A' road user, I love being able to fly around high speed bends and not have to worry about the bumps and open the throttle on the straighter sections. 133 bhp at wheel is plenty and the response is very good when going to overtake large queues - have to say on the other three I've not felt as safe as on my 750. Going to miss it but sure the others in the garage will just get more use! That sad I've got more than 60 mpg at times and that's far better than anything else with this much speed!

Ride Quality & Brakes
5 out of 5
-
Engine
5 out of 5
-
Build Quality & Reliability
4 out of 5
-
Value & Running Costs
4 out of 5
-
Equipment
3 out of 5
-
5 out of 5

What a top bike!

16 November 2011 by greenturbobob

I bought one in September, and thought it was good then. But since then I have clocked some more miles and it just seems to get better and better. The engine is smooth with good midrange and top end power. Its a little lacking in the lower revs... Read more but when do you ever do that? The suspension is the best I have ridden. You approach a pot hole and expect a hell of a bang but it doesn't happen. It just soaks up the bumps but remains firm for good cornering. Its light in the twisty's, frugal on fuel, and having put riser bars on, comfy too! For those who say its slow or its not a 1000, well I know what its like to own them, I have had a few, but for everyday use it has more than enough power.

Ride Quality & Brakes
5 out of 5
-
Engine
5 out of 5
-
Build Quality & Reliability
5 out of 5
-
Value & Running Costs
5 out of 5
-
Equipment
4 out of 5
-
3 out of 5

Gutless!

20 August 2011 by Feakster

... Maybe I'm being a little harsh because I normally ride an RSV. I ended up with this for a couple of days when my bike was in for work. As far as handling goes, I can't fault it... very sure-footed and easy apex-clipping. As far as the engine goes... Read more though... sh*te!! Everyone always raves about how it's the perfect compromise between a 600 and a 1000, but the truth of the matter is it's got less down low than my '06 636 ninja and less up top than my '06 RSVR (I think the 636 would have given it a run for its money with top end power!). It's just nothing... nothing... nothing... change, then nothing again. Makes for easy corner entry and exit because you never have to worry about getting flicked off, but the engine's never going to set your world on fire. It feels very flat/boring!

Ride Quality & Brakes
5 out of 5
-
Engine
1 out of 5
-
Build Quality & Reliability
5 out of 5
-
Value & Running Costs
4 out of 5
-
Equipment
3 out of 5
-
5 out of 5

GSXR750 vs GSR750

10 August 2011 by ottouberswengen

I sat on this bike. Loved the looks and overall dimensions and quality of production. I am VERY interested to buy this bike, however, I need to tailor it for the ROAD, so I can have primarily, an overall road bike with the best sporting attributes... Read more when required. Coming from a Hayabusa, I am seeking a lighter, better handling package overall, as well as a user friendly road-sport prowess without punishing my body if I should tour 4-6hrs a day on it. Can this be done, anyone? The alternative is the GSR750 and revise that upwards with better suspension. Apparently the GSR is not too shabby around the track as well.

Ride Quality & Brakes
5 out of 5
-
Engine
5 out of 5
-
Build Quality & Reliability
5 out of 5
-
Value & Running Costs
5 out of 5
-
Equipment
5 out of 5
-
5 out of 5

one for the road

06 July 2011 by neilybabe

I had a gsxr750k7 prior to a bandit 1250 and longed to return to a gsxr. After I recieved a new hip I took the plunge and bought the latest L1, what a bike..better than my K7 which took some doing (although I'm not so sure it's faster), it seems a... Read more more accomplished bike with no nasty suprises, just seems to handle any road surfaces and inspire licence (and liberty) losing levels of riding. Superb in every area.

Ride Quality & Brakes
5 out of 5
-
Engine
5 out of 5
-
Build Quality & Reliability
5 out of 5
-
Value & Running Costs
5 out of 5
-
Equipment
5 out of 5
-
5 out of 5

Completely new GSX-R750

02 July 2011 by D Ramage

Wow - I had the 2008 model before and loved that - thought it was wonderful, but the 2011 GSX-R750 is a completely new bike. Everything feels new, different, better. And it looks better quality too - something I know Suzuki's have received... Read more negative comments on before. Yeah it's considerably more expensive than the previous versions, but at least with the new model you can see what you're getting for the extra money - lovely Brembo mono-block brake calipers and Showa suspension. All it needs now is an Akropovic exhaust and it'll be complete.

Ride Quality & Brakes
4 out of 5
-
Engine
5 out of 5
-
Build Quality & Reliability
5 out of 5
-
Value & Running Costs
4 out of 5
-
Equipment
5 out of 5
-
Read all 8 owners' reviews in full

Facts & Figures

Model info
Year introduced 2011
Year discontinued -
New price £9,899
Used price £4,800 to £10,200
Warranty term Two year unlimited mileage
Running costs
Insurance group 16 of 17
Annual road tax £82
Annual service cost £250
Performance
Max power 148 bhp
Max torque 64 ft-lb
Top speed 175 mph
1/4-mile acceleration -
Average fuel consumption 39 mpg
Tank range 147 miles
Specification
Engine size 750cc
Engine type 16v, inline-four-cylinder
Frame type Aluminium twin spar
Fuel capacity 17 litres
Seat height 810mm
Bike weight 190kg
Front suspension 41mm Big Piston Forks forks, fully-adjustable
Rear suspension Single shock, fully adjustable
Front brake 2 x 310mm discs with Brembo monobloc four-piston radial calipers
Rear brake 220mm single disc with single-piston caliper.
Front tyre size 120/70 x 17
Rear tyre size 180/55 x 17

History & Versions

Model history

Model introduced in 2011

Other versions

None

Photo Gallery

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  • SUZUKI GSX-R750  (2011-on)
  • SUZUKI GSX-R750  (2011-on)
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