Full chat: Best motorcycle intercoms as chosen by MCN

Best motorcycle intercoms
Best motorcycle intercoms
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Motorcycle intercoms tend to divide opinion: while some motorcyclists prefer the silence and solitude of riding – in fact, that’s the draw for many – some swing the other way and like to be connected to their smartphones to make and take calls and listen to music.

Even if you find all that distracting, you can use them to hear sat nav directions or speak with their pillion or other riders in the group.

Generally comprising a pair of speakers, a microphone, a brain and a battery, these effectively replicate a wireless headset for phones and operate on Bluetooth, so you can also control your phone directly from the intercom. Most also allow for voice control to make operation safer while on the go, and they can also trigger your device’s voice control as well.

Other Deals at a Glance

Over 35% off Cardo Packtalk Slim JBL Bluetooth Intercom Twin Pack – save £209.99: was £559.98, now £349.99
Over 30% off Cardo Spirit Bluetooth Intercom Duo – save £58.34: was £183, now £124.66
Over 30% off SENA 30K Bluetooth Headset & Intercom Single – save £85.00: was £269.99, now £184.99
Over 15% off Cardo Packtalk Edge Mesh Intercom Single – save £71.21: was £356.00, now £284.79
28% off Cardo Freecom 2X – save £26: was £191, now £135.96

The best motorcycle intercoms at a glance:

Intercoms can either be universal or integrated fit; they are either designed to fit any helmet and generally sit a control unit outside the shell, or they can be integrated, designed specifically for one or two helmets and fit inside the lid in custom-made apertures. Which you choose is down to you and how often you change your helmet or how many you use. We’ve tried numerous intercoms, and these are what we reckon are the top ones.

Best motorcycle intercoms:

Save 20%

Price: £284.79 (was £356.00)
The Cardo Packtalk Edge is top for sound quality thanks to its JBL speakers. Audiophiles will be familiar with the name; JBL has been producing speakers and high-end audio equipment for decades, and their inclusion in the Packtalk Edge intercom gives superb levels of sound quality if you're listening to music on the go.

Call quality is very good, it has a decent range and includes both Bluetooth 5.2 and MESH technology for connecting up to 15 riders. We've reviewed the Cardo Packtalk Edge with a full rundown, including a range and battery life test.

Read our full Cardo Packtalk Edge review

Pros

  • Ease of use
  • Slim design
  • Audio quality

Cons

  • Several buttons
  • Voice sensitivity needs setting up
Dimensions 46 mm x 84 mm x 23 mm
Weight 47 g
Speakers 40 mm
Connectivity Bluetooth 5.2, dynamic mesh
Range 1.6 km/1 mile
Battery life 12 hours
  • Air mount
  • 2nd generation mesh Dynamic Mesh Control
  • Natural voice operation
  • IP67 waterproof
  • JBL audio
  • Over the air software updates
  • 3 year warranty
  • Connects with any other brand

Best for flip fronts

Price: £309.99 (was £469.90)
Bluetooth and mesh intercom with 1.2 mile range and smartphone connectivity for making calls and listening to music. Twin pack is ideal if you want to talk to a co rider or your pillion.

Pros

  • Dual pack
  • HD speakers
  • Uses Mesh system

Cons

  • Hard to hear at motorway speeds
Dimensions 102 mm x 56 mm x 27 mm
Weight 61 g
Speakers 40 mm
Connectivity Bluetooth 5.0, Mesh
Range 2 km / 1.2 miles
Battery life 11 hours
Charge time 2.5 hours
  • Mesh intercom
  • Bluetooth 5.0
  • Multi-channel communication
  • Advanced Noise Control
  • HD speakers
  • Audio Multitasking
  • Voice command
  • Group Intercom

Best for big groups

Price: £307.30 (was £439.99)
Sena's next-generation non-mesh intercom with updated speakers and improved functionality. The 20S Evo can support up to six connections so it's perfect for group riding.

Pros

  • Upgraded speakers
  • Supports up to six riders
  • Dual pack

Cons

  • Quite a big investment
Dimensions 94.7 mm x 48.3 mm x 25.5 mm
Weight 61 g
Speakers 40 mm
Connectivity Bluetooth 4.1
Range 2 km / 1.2 miles
Battery life 13 hours
Charge time 2.5 hours
  • Bluetooth 4.1
  • Audio Multitasking
  • 8-Way intercom
  • Voice command
  • Group Intercom
  • HD Speakers
  • Universal Intercom
  • Advanced Noise Control
  • Remote control compatible

Best for multitasking

Price: £165.94 (was £243)
This 20S Evo intercom from specialists Sena is the latest in their range of Bluetooth-powered hardware. It isn't mesh compatible (though you can add it with a £99 optional adapter), so it will 'only' connect with a maximum of eight other riders (or passengers) via Bluetooth 4.1 architecture with a maximum range of around a mile but for most riders who travel in groups or with a pillion, that should be fine.

Read our full Sena 20S Evo motorcycle intercom review

Pros

  • Bluetooth compatible
  • Connects with eight other units

Cons

  • Requires a £99 adapter to run mesh
Dimensions 94.7 mm x 48.3 mm x 25.5 mm
Weight 61 g
Speakers 40 mm
Connectivity Bluetooth 4.1
Range 2 km / 1.2 miles
Battery life 13 hours
Charge time 2.5 hours
  • Bluetooth 4.1
  • Audio Multitasking
  • 8-Way intercom
  • Voice command
  • Group Intercom
  • HD Speakers
  • Universal Intercom
  • Advanced Noise Control
  • Remote control compatible

Best value for money

Price: £174.99 (was £243)
An intercom and Bluetooth headset with speakers provided by JBL. The 4X can link up with three other devices to be used as an intercom on group rides.

Read our full Cardo Freecom 4X headset review

Pros

  • Exceptional sound quality
  • Reliable voice control
  • Availability of second-helmet kit

Cons

  • Can only connect to network of four devices
Dimensions 48 mm x 78 mm x 20mm
Weight 37 g
Speakers 40 mm
Connectivity Bluetooth, live intercom
Range 3.6 km / 2.2 miles
Battery life 13 hours
Charge time 2 hours
  • Natural voice operation
  • Sound by JBL
  • Live Bluetooth
  • Connects up to 4 riders
  • Over the Air software updates
  • 2 year warranty
  • Connects with any other brand

Best for being top integrated

Price: £199.99 (was £259.00)
The SRL2 system, produced by Sena, is designed to fit seamlessly within three helmets from Shoei - the NeoTec 2 (post-March 2019), J-Cruise 2 and the GT-Air 2. The unit replaces the two plastic side pieces, and the main unit sits in an aperture at the back of the helmet. It is controlled by three buttons on the left-hand side and uses the same chipset as the 20S Evo for similar functionality.

So while this will only work with one of three helmets, it is neat, subtle and fits easily and neatly. Note that most large helmet manufacturers (Shark, LS2, Schuberth etc.) also produce integrated intercom systems.

Read our full Sena SRL2 intercom review

Pros

  • Integrated design fits perfectly
  • Uses Sena's existing well-known platform
  • Headset and intercom functionality

Cons

  • Integrated battery, so have to 'charge' whole helmet
Dimensions Fully integrated to helmet
Connectivity Bluetooth 4.1
Range 1.6 km
Charge time 2.5 hours

Best for AGV helmets

Price: £187.49 (was £249.99)
If you own an AGV helmet, specifically a Sportmodular, AX9, K-5 S, or K6, this is the best intercom you'll find because it's designed specifically for your helmet. The ARK is curved, so it, erm, arcs around the bottom left of the outside of the helmet to the benefit of aerodynamics. It's good for calls, music, communication with up to four others up to a mile away, and FM radio if you need BBC Radio.

Pros

  • Integrates seamlessly if you have the right helmet
  • FM radio

Cons

  • No good if you don't have an AGV

Best remote control

Price: $49.96
This handy device from Sena can take all the fiddling out of finding the buttons on your headset intercom. This is more convenient, but it's also safer as you keep your hands closer to the bike's controls.

Read our full Sena RC3 remote control review

Pros

  • Lets you keep your hands on the bars
  • More convenient than helmet buttons

Cons

  • Just a controller

How do motorcycle intercoms work?

Intercoms will generally connect to phones and sat navs via Bluetooth and also to other intercoms. For speaking to pillions, this is fine and generally, for close groups, it’s OK too.

Bluetooth intercoms have a range of 1-1.5 miles quoted usually, depending on the antenna and can handle conversations with multiple riders. Though, for greater numbers or ranges, MESH technology can be useful.

This is an automatic system that seamlessly pairs and remembers groups of rides so that, should one become disconnected from the group, they will automatically reconnect when they come back in range.

If you want advice on how to install a motorcycle intercom, check out our guide.

How MCN tests products

At MCN, our team of expert journalists have decades of experience gained over hundreds of thousands of miles. We don’t test our kit to destruction; we use it exactly how you do, in the real world and in all conditions. That means we can deliver impartial buying advice you can rely on.

Each of our writers has an in-depth understanding of the needs of today’s biker… because they are one.

If you can’t see a review against an item on this page, it’s because we haven’t tested it yet. These items will only be included if we think they’re important and relevant in the market, and rest assured, we will be working on bringing you a review as soon as we’ve done the miles.

To find out more, head to our dedicated page explaining how we test motorcycle products.

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By Justin Hayzelden

Products Editor, shed enthusiast and tournament winner. Justin has been a regular contributor to MCN since 2009, working as a road tester, roving reporter and feature writer. He has built up a wealth of experience in putting the latest machinery through its paces, as well as subjecting every aspect of motorcycle kit to the rigours of real-world riding. A lifelong two-wheel enthusiast with a deep passion for motorcycles, Justin first hit the streets at 16 on a Suzuki TS50X and has since owned more bikes than he cares to remember. A spell as a London courier saw him cut his biking teeth on some of the country’s busiest roads and as an instructor he has striven to give many a novice the grounding to do the same. Justin has ridden on four continents (so far), both as a solo rider and as a tour guide, tackling terrain from the perilous mountain roads of the Himalayas to rugged South African dirt tracks, sweeping North American highways and the glorious passes of the European Alps. He likes nothing more than an early start for a full day in the saddle and takes great pleasure in sniffing out those roads less travelled – to Justin, every bike is an adventure bike. When not testing products, Justin can usually be found in his shed, where he maintains, restores and rebuilds not just bikes, but anything mechanical that comes his way. He currently owns a 2010 Triumph Sprint 1050 ST, 1998 Yamaha TRX 850 and is running a 2024 Harley-Davidson CVO Pan America as a long termer.