MOTO-GUZZI V7 SPECIAL (2017 - 2021) Review

At a glance

Owners' reliability rating: 4.5 out of 5 (4.5/5)
Power: 52 bhp
Seat height: Low (30.3 in / 770 mm)
Weight: Medium (461 lbs / 209 kg)

Prices

New N/A
Used £6,900

Overall rating

Next up: Ride & brakes
4 out of 5 (4/5)

The third generation of V7 is the best yet and manages to effortlessly combine the spirit of a classic Guzzi with modern refinements without losing any of that Mandello del Lario soul. A really beautiful and relaxed retro that will certainly win many fans.

In 2021 this bike was replaced by a revised version of the V7 with a larger 865cc engine. You can read our review here

Ride quality & brakes

Next up: Engine
4 out of 5 (4/5)

While the Guzzi is a bit stingy in its ground clearance, this is really only highlighted as the chassis is so much better than before. The bounce and jolt from the poor V7 II’s shocks has been replaced by a well damped rear and the V7 III now turns with proper agility into bends. It’s really good fun to ride through 60mph twisties and the ABS and traction control (which has two levels) stay hidden in the background and don’t interfere with this enjoyment.

Engine

Next up: Reliability
4 out of 5 (4/5)

On a retro you always hanker after a bit of spirit and soul and at low revs the V7’s transverse twin delivers exactly that, vibrating pleasingly, twisting due to the torque reaction and thumping its way through the lower rev range as the torque kicks in. But when you get to about 5000rpm it subtly changes character as the motor smoothes off and you are left with an engine that feels refined and plush with virtually no vibrations. It’s not the fastest, but feels fantastic.

Reliability & build quality

Next up: Value
4 out of 5 (4/5)

The V-twin engine is far from stressed as it only makes a fairly weak 52bhp, so you can’t imagine any horrors there. Some will criticise Guzzi’s build quality, but overall the V7 seems fairly robust and well put together and the V7 doesn’t have a reputation for unreliability.

Value vs rivals

Next up: Equipment
4 out of 5 (4/5)

On the face of it £8000 is a lot of money for a fairly basic air-cooled V-twin, and £8702 for the Special or £9002 for the Anniversario is even more for one with a few extras, but the Ducati Scrambler is £8850 for the Full Throttle and Classic and it is an air-cooled V-twin that lacks traction control. Considering Guzzis are still made in Italy in the same factory as they have always been, that’s not a bad price for a slice of motorcycling history.

Equipment

3 out of 5 (3/5)

The V7 III comes with two-stage traction control and ABS as standard, which is nice, and the dash can be linked to a smartphone via the accessory MG-AP kit. The dash itself has a gear indicator, which is good, but you don’t want too many accessories on a retro and the Guzzi is refreshingly basic. That said, adjustable suspension would be nice as only the shocks’ preload can be tweaked.

Specs

Engine size 744cc
Engine type Four-stroke, air-cooled V-twin
Frame type Tubular steel
Fuel capacity 21 litres
Seat height 770mm
Bike weight 209kg
Front suspension 40mm inverted forks, non-adjustable
Rear suspension Twin shocks, adjustable spring preload.
Front brake 1 x 320mm disc, Brembo four-piston caliper; ABS
Rear brake 260mm disc, two-piston caliper ABS
Front tyre size 100/90X18
Rear tyre size 130/80x17

Mpg, costs & insurance

Average fuel consumption 60 mpg
Annual road tax £96
Annual service cost -
New price -
Used price £6,900
Insurance group -
How much to insure?
Warranty term Two year unlimited mileage

Top speed & performance

Max power 52 bhp
Max torque 44.2 ft-lb
Top speed 100 mph
1/4 mile acceleration -
Tank range 240 miles

Model history & versions

Owners' reviews for the MOTO-GUZZI V7 SPECIAL (2017 - 2021)

2 owners have reviewed their MOTO-GUZZI V7 SPECIAL (2017 - 2021) and rated it in a number of areas. Read what they have to say and what they like and dislike about the bike below.

Review your MOTO-GUZZI V7 SPECIAL (2017 - 2021)

Summary of owners' reviews

Overall rating: 4.5 out of 5 (4.5/5)
Ride quality & brakes: 4.5 out of 5 (4.5/5)
Engine: 4.5 out of 5 (4.5/5)
Reliability & build quality: 4.5 out of 5 (4.5/5)
Value vs rivals: 4 out of 5 (4/5)
Equipment: 4.5 out of 5 (4.5/5)
4 out of 5 It's not a retro it's a true classic.
18 September 2021 by Rob H

Year: 2021

A modern (ish) bike that does feel like a classic 70s roadster. It's not perfect but I love riding it and it's surprisingly capable when pushed. Probably the worst features are basic suspension and poor fuelling. It has a rough patch between 3-4000 rpm but smooths out nicely above that. A beetle map and a set of Mistral pipe makes it a winner.

Ride quality & brakes 4 out of 5

The suspension is basic, the rear feels a bit harsh but softening the preload helps a lot. The forks are probably the worst feature of the bike, if you plan to keep it long term some improved internals will be money well spent. The brakes are just about up to the job, they are nicely modulated and the ABS is not intrusive .

Engine 4 out of 5

Owning a V7 is all about the engine, it's noisy and there plenty of vibes but that's the Guzzi charm. 52 bhp is not going to set the world on fire but once above 4000 rpm it feels a lot stronger. It will happily go all day at motorway speeds.

Reliability & build quality 5 out of 5

No issues to date and I was pleasantly surprised at he quality of the finish.

Value vs rivals 3 out of 5

Can be expensive to service due to annual valve adjustment and additional oils for the gearbox and final drive. But it's easy to work on and can be easily serviced by any competent owner.

Equipment 4 out of 5

The bike comes with ABS and 2 levels of Traction Control. ABS yes but the Traction Control is pretty pointless on such a mild engine. The Special come with twin clocks and features a clock, gear indicator and mpg readout as well as trip meters. These are accessed by a mode button on the right hand side of the bars. You can also program a red rpm warning light for various levels. All in all it has very little which is how it should be on a bike like this. The only addition would be Mistral short pipes, a lot lighter and sound lovely.

Buying experience: Buying the bike was simple, just rand the dealer, payed the money and had it delivered a week later.

5 out of 5
17 April 2021 by Smudgermsn

Year: 2019

A real head-turner. It was a close call between the V7 and a candy orange RE Interceptor. I chose the blue V7 for rarity and a clock! I think I made the right choice for a my first (only) new bike and milestone birthday present that I don’t intend to sell.

Ride quality & brakes 5 out of 5

Bike will go for miles, unfortunately age has caught up with me. Seat good for 2-2.5 hours before needing a walk about. Motorway wind speed needs a good hold of the throttle grip which is tiring; a much better A/B road 60mph ride but it’s a bike that encourages gentle riding and allows passers-by to admire the gleaming chrome.

Engine 5 out of 5

Excellent low down pull. An engine with character.

Reliability & build quality 4 out of 5

Ultra close inspection shows paint slightly thin in out of the way areas. A couple of rusty bolt heads. A bit of flaky ‘paint’ on rear wheel where shaft joins.

Value vs rivals 5 out of 5

First service at 900 miles done at main dealer. No issues. I’m not quick so have returned 68mpg average so easy 200 miles to the tank or 230 to empty. Fuel costs only is a little over 8p per mile. Tyres 3000 miles old and have 2.5mm on front and 3mm on rear.

Equipment 5 out of 5

Just above basic- but has essentials like clock, fuel light (which seems accurate enough), thermometer and ABS. More gadgets could be good, but I’m not sure I’d use them that much.

Buying experience: Bought unseen from dealer- just a few pictures and phone calls. New, with 8 miles on the clock. £7350 with centre stand fitted, delivered and half tank of fuel. Not too bad if the standard price should have been £8499. Dealer didn’t really contact once deal done and bike delivered so there’s the balance of paying more for a local relationship.

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