Nexx X.Wed3 review | MCN puts the latest adventure helmet to the test and it's got some flaws

4 out of 5

Nexx X.Wed3

from Sportsbike Shop
£509.99 View offer
Published: 10 June 2024 Updated: 12 June 2024

I tested the Nexx W.Wed2 motorcycle helmet on a trip to Spain back in 2017 and was impressed with the suite of features that the Portuguese manufacturer had packed into their flagship adventure lid.

It’s taken seven years and a change in the way helmets are certified (from ECE 22.05 to 22.06) for the next iteration to reach the shelves, and I’ve racked up 3,200 miles over the past 4 months with the latest X.Wed3. As a versatile, multi-purpose helmet it has a lot going for it, but is not without flaws.

Tested by Justin Hayzelden for four months and 3350 miles

Pros

  • Quiet with or without peak
  • Well integrated comms
  • Excellent ventilation

Cons

  • Chin strap too long
  • Ventilation ports can whistle
  • Comfort
    4.0
  • Visor
    5.0
  • Ventilation
    5.0
  • Noise
    4.0
  • Looks
    4.0
  • Quality
    4.0
  • Value
    4.0
  • Overall
    4.0
Weight 1790g
Construction Multi-composite fibre shell
Chin strap type Double D-ring
Intercom ready Yes
Drop down sun visor Yes
Pinlock Yes (included)
Interior Soft anti-sweat and anti-allergic fabric inner lining
Shell sizes 3 (XXS-S, M-L, XL-XXXL)
Warranty Two years
Safety standard ECE 22.06
  • High-impact carbon fibre shell
  • Fast release system allows for easy removal and cleaning of the full interior
  • Soft-touch X-Mart Dry fabrics that keep the interior cool and dry
  • Synthetic leather lining with large ventilation mesh panels
  • Anti-vibration EPS helps reduce turbulent air at high speeds
  • X-Foam crash bumpers at the base of the chin and sides help absorb energy in the event of an off
  • Removable peak, with 3 levels of adjustment
  • Retractable large inner sun visor
  • Spring-loaded visor recoil system gives a perfect airtight seal
  • Pinlock insert included in the box
  • 7 air intake vents and 4 exhaust outlet
  • Double D ring strap with magnetic button closure
  • Integrated goggle strap holder
  • X-COM3 series can be fully integrated into the helmet (not included)

Is the Nexx X.Wed3 comfortable?

First off, fit is absolutely bang on. I take a medium and it slipped easily onto my noggin without any need for adjustment, so that’s a win. The interior padding is soft to the touch has a plush, cushioned feel to it, with plenty of spring in the foam to keep it snugged against your head without any undue pressure.

I like the way the cheek pads cradle my jawline, it makes the X.Wed3 feel secure on my head even before doing up the chin strap, and that sensation follows all the way around the back of the head.

I’ve spent a full day riding around the back roads and byways of Norfolk and it was barely off my head for more than then the few minutes it took to chow down on a snack or glug some fluids. There wasn’t a single moment I felt the need to remove it to give my skull a break.

Nexx X.Wed3 rear

Although it fits well, the X.Wed3 doesn’t have the neutral balance of, say, the Arai Tour-X 5. Where the Arai’s bulk seems to disappear once you put it on, the X.Wed3 is biased towards the front and tends to pull your chin down. Airflow under the peak can negate this at speed, but it’s certainly a consideration for extended town or off-road riding. It also weighs 200 grammes more than the T-X 5 on our scales.  

One other niggle I have with regards to comfort is the length of the chinstrap. Although it uses a traditional D-ring fastener (why manufacturers employ other methods is beyond me), it’s just far too long, as is its padded sleeve. The result is a bunching up of fabric under the chin and a tendency for the strap to twist, which, although it can be avoided with care, is all too easy to do when all you want to do is cinch it up and ride.

The strap end is secured with a magnet when fastened, however the extra length means it hangs in a loop and can be easily dislodged to flap around. This can be really annoying if you’ve just set off for a long ride and have to stop.

Is the Nexx X.Wed3 visor any good?

Nexx X.Wed3 visor mechanism

Being an adventure-style helmet, the X.Wed3 has a large eye port by design, and it gives uninterrupted vision both laterally and vertically. Two visors are included, a clear and dark smoke, along with a storage bag and Pinlock anti-fog insert.

I have heard of fitting problems with the insert, however I’ve transferred mine between the two shields on numerous occasions and haven’t managed to damage it with my stubby-fingered hamfistery as yet. If anything, I’ve found this easier than with other visors from other manufacturers, such as Arai or Shoei.

The visor mechanism deserves special mention, in particular the way it locks in the fully open and closed positions. Springs at either side pull its locator lugs firmly into deep detents, which in the open position prevents it from shutting unexpectedly. Very handy if you’re on a rough surface and want to maintain maximum airflow.

Nexx X.Wed3 Pinlock

When closed this system increases pressure on the weather seal, effectively rendering it watertight. Despite riding regularly in near monsoon conditions and incessant truck spray on the A47 (such are the joys of a UK spring) it hasn’t sprung a leak anywhere. There’s also a central lock to ensure it stays shut. A handy tab on the left-hand side allows movement through the entire arc of operation.

Removal is intuitively easy and achieved in the fully open position. There’s a button at either side that releases the visor at its pivot, allowing you to simply lift it off. Installation, as they say, is the reverse of removal, however it’s not so straightforward with the smoked visor as the tint is so dark you can’t see the locator lug through it.

In addition to the main visor, the X.Wed3 has an internal sunshade. This is suitably dark for most conditions when used with the clear visor, and gives a generous area of coverage, almost down to the tip of my nose. It sits well forward though, and I haven’t had any incidents of with it interfering with my hooter.

Nexx X.Wed3 action shot

I do find the operating mechanism a bit awkward, however. The lever is high up on the left-hand side, and despite having used it countless times, I still have to scrabble about to find it. To other road users it must look like I’m having a moment of bafflement over directions or something…

Nexx X.Wed3 ventilation

If there’s one thing the X.Wed3 is not short of, it’s ventilation. The frontal area has seven separate adjustable vents, and when you have them all open at once it allows a jet stream of fresh air to rush through channels in the inner EPS (Expanded Polystyrene) layer and out through quad exhaust ports at the rear. The lining has generous mesh panels to help with the flow and you can literally feel the wind in your hair.

All have two positions, open and closed, apart from the top vent which has a middle setting too. I’ve tried them out with thick winter gloves, and apart from actually finding them (they sit with a very low profile), operation is just a simple case of sliding the top cover back and forth. Access is not hampered by the peak. The chin vent also has a foam filter, and a nice addition to the included accessories kit is a blank plug that can fitted instead for dustier conditions.

Nexx X.Wed3 chin vent

A drawback to all these vents is that they can whistle when open. I found this particularly annoying in ‘sports tourer’ mode without the peak fitted. The severity is dependant on riding position and windscreen and seems to be less of a problem the more upright you are. Most people are likely to buy the X.Wed3 for adventure bikes, but it’s worth bearing in mind if you plan to use it on a sportier second bike.   

Is the Nexx X.Wed3 a noisy helmet?

Although I always ride in earplugs, the X.Wed3 is a noticeably quiet lid. Construction includes a rubber gasket between the EPS and outer shell designed to soak up any vibrations from turbulent air. It certainly seems to work, plus the peak has rubber mountings to prevent resonance in the same way. I haven’t noticed any pockets of localised wind roar at all.

This particular helmet has been fitted with an intercom, and I’ve  been told on that phone calls that, although it sounds like I’m wearing a helmet, there’s no additional noise from the bike or surrounding air. Likewise, I can hear the speakers right up to 70mph without having to resort to full volume – more like 8 out of 10.

Nexx X.Wed3 optional intercom review

Nexx X.Wed3 intercom

My X.Wed3 has the optional X.Com3 intercom (£169.99), which fits seamlessly into prepared pockets and channels in the inner lining. Unusually, the microphone mounts above the left eye in a recess in the EPS behind the lining. As mentioned above, it works perfectly well in that location, which did come as a surprise.

The X.Com3 uses tried and tested Sena technology (similar to Shoei’s SRL system) and has proved faultless so far. It’s Bluetooth 5.1 and seems to stay charged for days. Nexx quote a talk time of 13 hours, and I haven’t as yet challenged that. I’ve also yet to test its bike to bike capabilities.

There is also a more advanced X.Com3 available for £339.98, which has Mesh technology, advanced noise control and uprated speakers.  

Does the Nexx X.Wed3 look good?

Nexx X.Wed3 worn on the road

I find the overall design of the X.Wed3 a bit fussy as the hardware, such as vents, goggle strap retainer and the eye port surround, are quite prominent.

No doubt this is part of the ‘look’, just not to my personal taste. I do like the white/neon yellow ‘Keyo’ colour scheme though, which allows the carbon weave of the shell construction to show through and has a subtle satin sheen. It has a nice tactile quality too.

I’d describe the look as ‘technical’, and it actually works better as a streetfighter style lid when the peak’s removed.

Is the Nexx X.Wed3 good quality?

Nexx X.Wed3 adventure bike helmet

The X.Wed3 feels like a well made product. The shell is perfectly laid carbon fibre (for as much as I can see anyway), and all the vents and various other bits are up to a top-notch standard. Although the interior lining is soft and pliable, it’s durable enough to withstand many removals and washings, and should last for the life of the lid.

There’s also a ‘bumper’ under the chin and along the edges to guard against sternum and clavicle injuries. This is no doubt functional, but also adds to the high-end feel – although it probably increases weight too.

Interestingly, the X.Wed3 has a lightweight plastic lining between the EPS and removable interior, which seems to be primarily to house a sliding mechanism for retaining the cheek pads. I can’t think of another helmet manufacturer that does this and although it must add a good few grammes to the overall bulk, it does bolster the quality feel. That said, I can’t help feeling that it’s unnecessary.

Nexx X.Wed3 lining

One thing that does bother me, is the depth of EPS across the brow. It’s almost half the thickness of that in the Tour-X 5, which is no doubt a concession to accommodate the integral sun visor. Sure, it meets ECE 22.06 safety certification, but given the choice I’d rather have the additional shock absorption than convenience of a sun shade.

Is the Nexx X.Wed3 good value for money?

At £509.99 the X.Wed3 is in the upper middle price bracket for helmets, and works out good value due to its versatility and the accessory options that come with it. It can be used as dedicated off road lid with goggles by removing the visor and installing cover plates over the mechanism, or as a streetfighter/sports helmet without the peak. It doesn’t need any tools for either of these, taking just a few minutes to convert.

It also comes with a variety of action camera attachments, allowing you to mount a GoPro style device to various points should you wish to record your on and off road antics. The inclusion of a dark tint visor, and a peak extension, adds to the VFM appeal too.

All Nexx helmets come with a three year compliance warranty as standard, which can be extended to five on registration.

Nexx X.Wed3 rivals:

Tested by Justin Hayzelden for 3100 miles

"The Arai Tour-X 5 is a well constructed, comfortable and versatile helmet. It brings together some of the best features of the current range, such as the RX-7’s visor system, Quantic’s logo vent and Profile V’s wider base, along with improvements of its own, to stand as a testament to the company’s commitment to safety through measured evolution.

"With the peak fitted the T-X 5 is ideal for adventure touring, boasting ample room to flip the visor up and wear goggles if needs be, and with it removed makes a smart and practical alternative to a traditional full-face lid. In a previous review I said that the T-X 4 could be the only lid you’ll ever need, but with its quick-change visor, improved shape and enhanced ventilation, the Tour-X 5 takes that versatility to the next level."

Read our full Arai Tour-X 5 review

Pros

  • Comfortable
  • Versatile
  • Wide field of vision
  • Easy visor change
  • Excellent ventilation
  • High build quality
  • Adjustable fit

Cons

  • Cheek pads are a little too 'Velcro friendly'
  • Comfort
    5.0
  • Visor
    5.0
  • Ventilation
    5.0
  • Noise
    4.0
  • Looks
    5.0
  • Quality
    5.0
  • Value
    5.0
  • Overall
    5.0
Weight 1,700 grammes
Construction Complex fibre laminate
Chin strap type D ring
Intercom ready Yes
Drop down sun visor No
Pinlock Yes
Interior Fully removable, moisture wicking and washable
Warranty 5 years
Safety standard ECE 22.06
  • Adaptive fit
  • Removable peak
  • Adjustable peak
  • Quick release visor
  • Fully removable and washable moisture wicking liner
  • Speaker cavities
  • Pinlock included
  • Adjustable vents
Tested by Ben Clarke for 500 miles

"The Bell MX-9 ADV is a cracking helmet for a bargain price. You can tell that the design started out in life as an off-road model - the MX in the name is a giveaway - as it's a lightweight helmet that's low on features with a huge view port.

"It's quite drafty on the road thanks to this off-road pedigree but not so much that it ruins the riding experience.

"I've been testing the MX-9 on a Triumph Scrambler with no wind protection at all and the peak is stiff enough to resist flapping around but has huge cut-outs that let the air pass through, so it doesn't try to rip your head off either.

"For the price, it really is a great piece of kit."

Full review coming soon

Pros

  • Excellent value for money
  • Nice wide field of vision
  • Peak copes well with the wind
  • Well ventilated

Cons

  • Quite noisy compared to market leaders
  • No drop down sun visor
  • Comfort
    5.0
  • Visor
    5.0
  • Ventilation
    5.0
  • Noise
    2.0
  • Looks
    5.0
  • Quality
    4.0
  • Value
    5.0
  • Overall
    4.0
Weight 1730g
Construction Multi-composite
Chin strap type Double D-ring
Intercom ready Yes
Drop down sun visor No
Pinlock Not needed
Interior Removable
Shell sizes Three
Warranty Five years
Safety standard ECE 22.06
  • Fog free visor
  • Flow ventilation
  • MIPS liner
Tested by Richard Newland for five months, 5,000 miles

"This is my first Shoei, ever – and it’s made me regret not picking one up sooner. The quality, fit and features are all superb and more than on-par with the Arai Tour-X 4 I’ve worn for the previous 40,000+ mile to this.

"The Hornet ADV is an ECE 22.05 helmet, meaning it’s not the latest standard (ECE 22.06), and will need to be replaced in the line-up soon. But if you need an adventure helmet right now, this is still a great option.

"Available in four shell sizes to deliver the best fit possible, the Hornet’s shell is organic fibre composite, with a multiple density EPS. The peak is pleasingly rigid, meaning no flex or vibration in the airflow even at speed (my Tour-X 4 peak flaps like a seagull in turbulence), although those who like a removeable peak, or to have the option of wearing goggles, will need to look elsewhere.

"The visor system is excellent, allowing for simple click-out, click-in replacement with the peak fitted. The only niggle here is that it’s very hard to locate the tabs when you’re fitting a dark visor back onto the helmet as you’re effectively blind.

"Clear visors are easy. The fitment is very good, and I’ve suffered no leaks riding in heavy rain."

Read our full Shoei Hornet ADV review

Pros

  • Comfortable
  • Simple and quick visor change
  • Superb quality
  • Great fit
  • Rigid peak, meaning no flex at speed

Cons

  • Peak is not detachable
  • Ventilation leaves a little to be desired in exceptionally warm conditions
  • ECE 22.05 standard
  • Quality
    4.0
  • Value
    4.0
Weight 1,430 grammes
Chinstrap Type D ring
Construction Organic fibre composite
Safety Standard ECE 22.05
Pinlock Yes
Interior Removable and washable liner
  • Quick release visor
  • 4 shell sizes available
  • Quick release cheek pads
  • Chin, brow and crown air inlet vents

MCN’s Nexx X.Wed3 verdict

It seems an odd thing to say, given its performance across the board, but I have reservations about recommending the Nexx X.Wed3. My biggest issue is the weight, as just short of 2kg (on our scale) is a lot of bulk for a lid. It’s by far the heaviest helmet I own, and that includes fully loaded flip ups.

The issue is further exacerbated by the tendency for it to tip forward, putting strain on the neck at slow speeds, and when the peak gets caught by a gust of side wind it has the momentum to give you a fair old wrench, as I’ve discovered to my detriment.

I also have concerns about the thickness of the EPA across the brow, and the cavity created for the sun shade between that and the outer shell. Yes, it meets ECE 22.06 certification, but there’s a lot of flex in the shell there and for peace of mind I think I’d rather have the excess protection.

Tested by Justin Hayzelden for four months and 3350 miles

Pros

  • Quiet with or without peak
  • Well integrated comms
  • Excellent ventilation

Cons

  • Chin strap too long
  • Ventilation ports can whistle
  • Comfort
    4.0
  • Visor
    5.0
  • Ventilation
    5.0
  • Noise
    4.0
  • Looks
    4.0
  • Quality
    4.0
  • Value
    4.0
  • Overall
    4.0
Weight 1790g
Construction Multi-composite fibre shell
Chin strap type Double D-ring
Intercom ready Yes
Drop down sun visor Yes
Pinlock Yes (included)
Interior Soft anti-sweat and anti-allergic fabric inner lining
Shell sizes 3 (XXS-S, M-L, XL-XXXL)
Warranty Two years
Safety standard ECE 22.06
  • High-impact carbon fibre shell
  • Fast release system allows for easy removal and cleaning of the full interior
  • Soft-touch X-Mart Dry fabrics that keep the interior cool and dry
  • Synthetic leather lining with large ventilation mesh panels
  • Anti-vibration EPS helps reduce turbulent air at high speeds
  • X-Foam crash bumpers at the base of the chin and sides help absorb energy in the event of an off
  • Removable peak, with 3 levels of adjustment
  • Retractable large inner sun visor
  • Spring-loaded visor recoil system gives a perfect airtight seal
  • Pinlock insert included in the box
  • 7 air intake vents and 4 exhaust outlet
  • Double D ring strap with magnetic button closure
  • Integrated goggle strap holder
  • X-COM3 series can be fully integrated into the helmet (not included)

Those issues aside, The X.Wed3 is well built and does not leave you wanting for features, making it a viable adventure touring option. I’ve done a good thousand miles on sports tourers and nakeds without the peak fitted, so it does have genuine versatility if you got a couple of bikes.