Product Review: Scott Dual Raid TP suit, jacket and trousers

By Andy Davidson -

Leathers, jackets & suits

 30 April 2014 11:00

Scott Dual Raid TP suit, jacket £349.95, trousers £219.95

Time tested: Seven months, 3000 miles

What’s good? This suit means business. It’s packed with nifty features and has a distinctly off-road feel. It veers on the lightweight, breathable and functional side over other thick and heavy adventure suits. It’s ideally suited to hot weather riding with a quality ventilation system. Vents are peppered on the legs, back, chest and arms. The sleeves are also detachable. Four pockets on the outside, one on the inside, a map pocket and an additional transparent sleeve pocket also come in handy. This is the ideal jacket for proper adventure riders who love off-roading. I used this suit to ride to Italy, take part in a 24-hour off-road rally through the Alps in searing heat and ride back through torrential rain. It’s robust, versatile and comfortable. If I left for a round-the-world adventure tomorrow I’d take the Scott Dual Raid without a second thought.   

What’s not? On the way home from Italy it bucketed it down and water did seep through. However, I rode with a colleague in a £1300+ suit and his leaked too (not as much as mine, but it still leaked). For less than half the price I’d definitely keep the Scott and pack a one-piece rain suit – the preferred method for most adventure riders as it keeps weight and bulk down. This isn’t a British weather commuter suit, but a practical and adaptable traveller’s suit. My only problem is the bottom of the trouser leg. There is no zip or fastener to expand the opening, which makes pulling the trouser leg over a bulky off-road boot a pain. Also the back protector comes separately at £24.95.

Contact: www.scott-sports.com
Quality rating: 5/5
Value rating: 4/5

Details:
Water pack pocket: This large back pocket accommodates a bladder pack with an integrated hole for the hose to pass through and hoops to keep it in place.
Liner: The thermal liner has a proper storm flap, which stops the brunt of wind chill from hitting your chest. It’s easily removable, thin and light so there’s plenty of space for proper thermal attire if you’re heading into the cold.