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Product Review: Airoh ST 701 Helmet

One year and 5500 miles on and my Airoh ST 701 lid is still giving good service. The lining remains plush and nothing has broken or shown undue signs of wear and tear.

The Italian company’s blurb claims that the helmet has been wind-tunnel tested and I can definitely confirm that it doesn’t suffer much in the way of buffeting at motorway speeds on naked bikes.

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Noise-wise, it is ok but as with most helmets it is best worn with earplugs and there is a slight whistle. The drop-down sunvisor keeps things versatile and is manned with a smooth-operating slider on the left-hand side. Some drop-down visors I have tried leave an annoying gap of bright light at the bottom but I’ve not had any problems with this one.

The main visor comes Pinlock ready and has a catch to keep it securely closed. Swapping visors is easy, but with the drop-down sunny there is rarely any need to chop and change.

The strap has a double-D fastening, which is something I prefer to seatbelt style buckles as I find it quick and easy to get a snug fit. Downsides? It’s not cheap, with a price of around £399.99.


Here's what I thought after the first six months...

Six months of use with the Airoh ST 701 have left me full of admiration and here are my thoughts after 3500 miles.

This one’s been my lid of choice all summer – and I’ve been impressed with its performance. Pretty much all my riding is done on a naked bike and the wind-tunnel-tested Airoh has performed well with no fatigue-inducing buffeting issues.

Comfort was fine from the off and I’ve been impressed with the drop-down sun visor, which does a great job against low-angle sunshine and has a more pleasing mechanism than some I have tried.

The main visor is equipped to take a Pinlock so there’s no fogging and visor changes don’t demand any sort of knack, which is good news. The vents are easy to use with gloved hands and work fine.

Airoh also use two shell sizes, so people with small heads won’t look like British Superbike mascot Big Ed. Weight is claimed 1400g (+50g) and the lid is approved for track use - although my riding tends to be commuting and weekend outings.

While the visor mechanism is easy to get on with and locks down, I have suffered from whistling when riding at motorway speeds. The super-bright graphics may not be to everyone’s taste either, but it does come in a range of options and at a penny under £400, it is quite costly.